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The association between sweet taste function, anthropometry, and dietary intake in adults

Low, Julia Y. Q., Lacy, Kathleen E., McBride, Robert and Keast, Russell S. J. 2016, The association between sweet taste function, anthropometry, and dietary intake in adults, Nutrients, vol. 8, no. 4, Article number : 241, pp. 1-14, doi: 10.3390/nu8040241.

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Title The association between sweet taste function, anthropometry, and dietary intake in adults
Author(s) Low, Julia Y. Q.
Lacy, Kathleen E.
McBride, Robert
Keast, Russell S. J.
Journal name Nutrients
Volume number 8
Issue number 4
Season Article number : 241
Start page 1
End page 14
Total pages 14
Publisher MDPI
Place of publication Basel, Switzerland
Publication date 2016
ISSN 2072-6643
Keyword(s) BMI
dietary intake
high intensity sweeteners
sugar
sweet taste
sweet taste function
sweet taste intensity
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Nutrition & Dietetics
Summary Variation in ability to detect, recognize, and perceive sweetness may influence food consumption, and eventually chronic nutrition-related conditions such as overweight and obesity. The aim of this study was to investigate the associations between sweet taste function, anthropometry, and dietary intake in adults. Participants' (n = 60; mean age in years = 26, SD = ±7.8) sweet taste function for a range of sweeteners (glucose, fructose, sucrose, sucralose, erythritol, and Rebaudioside A) was assessed by measuring detection and recognition thresholds and sweetness intensity. Height, weight, and waist circumference were also measured, and participants also completed a Food Frequency Questionnaire. There was large inter-individual variation in detection, recognition and sweetness intensity measures. Pearson's correlation coefficient revealed no robust correlations between measures of sweet taste function, anthropometry, and dietary intake, with the exception of suprathreshold intensity, which was moderately correlated with total energy intake (r = 0.23-0.40). One-way analysis of variance revealed no significant differences between the most and least sensitive participants in terms of BMI, waist circumference, and dietary intake for all measures of sweet taste function and sweeteners (all p > 0.01). When stratified into BMI categories, there were no significant differences in any measure of sweet taste function between the normal weight and overweight/obese participants (all p > 0.01). Results show that that sweet taste function is not associated with anthropometry and sweetness intensity measures are the most appropriate measure when assessing links between sweet taste and food consumption.
Language eng
DOI 10.3390/nu8040241
Field of Research 111102 Dietetics and Nutrigenomics
1111 Nutrition And Dietetics
Socio Economic Objective 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30083150

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.