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The failures of neo-liberal state building in Iraq: assessing Australia's post-conflict reconstruction and development Initiatives

Hassin, Ahmed and Isakhan, Benjamin 2016, The failures of neo-liberal state building in Iraq: assessing Australia's post-conflict reconstruction and development Initiatives, Australian journal of politics and history, vol. 62, no. 1, pp. 88-100, doi: 10.1111/ajph.12209.

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Title The failures of neo-liberal state building in Iraq: assessing Australia's post-conflict reconstruction and development Initiatives
Author(s) Hassin, Ahmed
Isakhan, BenjaminORCID iD for Isakhan, Benjamin orcid.org/0000-0002-5153-7110
Journal name Australian journal of politics and history
Volume number 62
Issue number 1
Start page 88
End page 100
Total pages 13
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell
Place of publication Chichester, Eng.
Publication date 2016-03
ISSN 0004-9522
1467-8497
Keyword(s) Arts & Humanities
Social Sciences
History
Political Science
Government & Law
Summary This article examines Australia's post-conflict reconstruction and development initiatives in Iraq following the intervention of 2003. Overall, it finds that Australia privileged the neo-liberal model of post-conflict state building by investing in projects that would enhance the capacity of the new Iraqi state, its key institutions and the private sector towards the imposition of a liberal democracy and a free-market economy. To demonstrate, this article documents the failures of the Australian government's stated aims to "support agriculture" and "support vulnerable populations" via interviews conducted in Iraq with rural farmers and tribal members and those working in, or the beneficiaries of, Iraq's disability sector. It concludes by noting that such failures are not only indicative of the inadequacy of the neo-liberal state building model, but also that these failures point the way forward for future post-conflict reconstruction and development projects which ought to be premised on a genuine and sustained commitment to addressing the needs of those made most vulnerable by war and regime change.
Language eng
DOI 10.1111/ajph.12209
Field of Research 160602 Citizenship
160607 International Relations
160601 Australian Government and Politics
1606 Political Science
2103 Historical Studies
Socio Economic Objective 940201 Civics and Citizenship
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, The Authors
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30083193

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