Assessing the validity of tympanic temperature to predict core temperature of firefighters in different environmental conditions

Langridge, Peter, Ruzic, Anna, Larsen, Brianna, Lord, Cara and Aisbett, Brad 2013, Assessing the validity of tympanic temperature to predict core temperature of firefighters in different environmental conditions, in Proceedings of Bushfire CRC & AFAC 2012 Conference Research Forum, Bushfire CRC, [Perth, W.A.], pp. 150-159.

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Title Assessing the validity of tympanic temperature to predict core temperature of firefighters in different environmental conditions
Author(s) Langridge, Peter
Ruzic, Anna
Larsen, Brianna
Lord, Cara
Aisbett, BradORCID iD for Aisbett, Brad orcid.org/0000-0001-8077-0272
Conference name Bushfire CRC & AFAC. Conference Research Forum (2012 : Perth, Western Australia)
Conference location Perth, Western Australia
Conference dates 28 Aug. 2012
Title of proceedings Proceedings of Bushfire CRC & AFAC 2012 Conference Research Forum
Editor(s) Thornton, R.P.
Wright, L.J.
Publication date 2013
Start page 150
End page 159
Total pages 10
Publisher Bushfire CRC
Place of publication [Perth, W.A.]
Summary The present study examined the validity of tympanic temperature measurements as a predictor of core temperature on the fireground in different environmental conditions. Fiftyone volunteer firefighters participated in the study across four different conditions, the conditions consisted of; 1) passive (i.e., no intervention) cooling in cold ambient temperatures (0-6°C); 2) cooling (through water immersion) in cool ambient temperatures (10-12ºC); 3) cooling (through water immersion) in warm ambient temperatures (21.5°C); and, 4) passive cooling in warm ambient temperatures (22°C). Firefighters wore full structural personal protective clothing while performing common firefighting duties including search and rescue tasks for 20-40 minutes. There was no difference between core and tympanic temperature immediately post-exercise across any condition. However, for all conditions, tympanic temperature dropped significantly faster than core temperature from 0 minutes, and remained significantly lower (p < 0.05) than core temperature from nine to 20 minutes post-training. The results show that there is no consistent difference between core and tympanic temperature during recovery from a simulated firefighting task across a range of different ambient conditions. Agencies should, accordingly, prioritize investigating other practical markers of core temperature as part of a broader heat stress management plan for firefighters.
Language eng
Field of Research 111705 Environmental and Occupational Health and Safety
Socio Economic Objective 920407 Health Protection and/or Disaster Response
HERDC Research category E1.1 Full written paper - refereed
Copyright notice ©2012, Bushfire CRC
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30083197

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