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Depressive symptomatology, weight status and obesogenic risk among Australian adolescents: a prospective cohort study

Hoare, Erin, Millar, Lynne, Fuller-Tyszkiewicz, Matthew, Skouteris, Helen, Nichols, Melanie, Malakellis, Mary, Swinburn, Boyd and Allender, Steven 2016, Depressive symptomatology, weight status and obesogenic risk among Australian adolescents: a prospective cohort study, BMJ open, vol. 6, no. 3, Article Number : e010072, pp. 1-11, doi: 10.1136/bmjopen-2015-010072.

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Title Depressive symptomatology, weight status and obesogenic risk among Australian adolescents: a prospective cohort study
Author(s) Hoare, ErinORCID iD for Hoare, Erin orcid.org/0000-0001-6186-0221
Millar, Lynne
Fuller-Tyszkiewicz, MatthewORCID iD for Fuller-Tyszkiewicz, Matthew orcid.org/0000-0003-1145-6057
Skouteris, Helen
Nichols, MelanieORCID iD for Nichols, Melanie orcid.org/0000-0002-7834-5899
Malakellis, MaryORCID iD for Malakellis, Mary orcid.org/0000-0003-2063-2040
Swinburn, Boyd
Allender, StevenORCID iD for Allender, Steven orcid.org/0000-0002-4842-3294
Journal name BMJ open
Volume number 6
Issue number 3
Season Article Number : e010072
Start page 1
End page 11
Total pages 11
Publisher BMJ
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2016
ISSN 2044-6055
Keyword(s) MENTAL HEALTH
PREVENTIVE MEDICINE
PUBLIC HEALTH
Summary OBJECTIVES: Adolescence is a period of increased risk for mental health problems and development of associated lifestyle risk behaviours. This study examined cross-sectional and longitudinal associations between obesogenic risk factors, weight status, and depressive symptomatology in a cohort of Australian adolescents.

DESIGN: Prospective cohort study.

SETTING: The study used repeated measures data from the Australian Capital Territory (ACT) It's Your Move project, an Australian community-based obesity prevention intervention. Intervention effect was non-significant therefore intervention and comparison groups were combined in this study.

PARTICIPANTS: Total sample was 634 secondary school students (female n=338, male n=296) with mean age 13 years (SD=0.6) at baseline (2012) and 15 years (SD=0.6) at follow-up (2014) recruited from 6 government secondary schools in the ACT.

PRIMARY AND SECONDARY OUTCOMES MEASURES: Primary outcome was depressive symptomatology measured by Short Mood and Feelings Questionnaire. Secondary outcomes were weight status, physical activity, screen time and diet related measures.

RESULTS: Increased physical activity was associated to lower depressive symptomatology among males (OR=0.35, p<0.05). Sweet drink (OR=1.15, p<0.05) and takeaway consumption (OR=1.84, p<0.05) were associated with higher levels of depressive symptomatology among females at follow-up. Males who were classified as overweight or obese at baseline, and remained so over the study period, were at increased risk of depressive symptomatology at follow-up (b=1.63, 95% CI 0.33 to 2.92). Inactivity among males over the 2-year study period was predictive of higher depressive symptomatology scores at follow-up (b=2.55, 95% CI 0.78 to 4.32). For females, those who increased their consumption of takeaway foods during the study period were at increased risk for developing depressive symptomatology (b=1.82, 95% CI -0.05 to 3.71).

CONCLUSIONS: There are multiple, probably complex, relationships between diet, physical activity and outcomes of obesity and mental health as well as between the outcomes themselves. Healthier diets and increased physical activity should be foundations for healthier body weight and mental health.
Language eng
DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2015-010072
Field of Research 111704 Community Child Health
Socio Economic Objective 920209 Mental Health Services
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution non-commercial licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30083202

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.