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Systematic examination of publicly-available information reveals the diverse and extensive corporate political activity of the food industry in Australia

Mialon, Melissa, Swinburn, Boyd, Allender, Steven and Sacks, Gary 2016, Systematic examination of publicly-available information reveals the diverse and extensive corporate political activity of the food industry in Australia, BMC public health, vol. 16, pp. 1-13, doi: 10.1186/s12889-016-2955-7.

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Title Systematic examination of publicly-available information reveals the diverse and extensive corporate political activity of the food industry in Australia
Author(s) Mialon, Melissa
Swinburn, Boyd
Allender, Steven
Sacks, GaryORCID iD for Sacks, Gary orcid.org/0000-0001-9736-1539
Journal name BMC public health
Volume number 16
Article ID 283
Start page 1
End page 13
Total pages 13
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2016
ISSN 1471-2458
Keyword(s) Corporate political activity
Food industry
Non-communicable diseases
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Public, Environmental & Occupational Health
PROPOSED APPROACH
TOBACCO
ENVIRONMENTS
PREVENTION
MONITOR
OBESITY
HEALTH
POLICY
Summary BACKGROUND: The political influence of the food industry, referred to as corporate political activity (CPA), represents a potential barrier to the development and implementation of effective public health policies for non-communicable diseases prevention. This paper reports on the feasibility and limitations of using publicly-available information to identify and monitor the CPA of the food industry in Australia.

METHODS: A systematic search was conducted for information from food industry, government and other publicly-available data sources in Australia. Data was collected in relation to five key food industry actors: the Australian Food and Grocery Council; Coca Cola; McDonald's; Nestle; and Woolworths, for the period January 2012 to February 2015. Data analysis was guided by an existing framework for classifying CPA strategies of the food industry.

RESULTS: The selected food industry actors used multiple CPA strategies, with 'information and messaging' and 'constituency building' strategies most prominent.

CONCLUSIONS: The systematic analysis of publicly-available information over a limited period was able to identify diverse and extensive CPA strategies of the food industry in Australia. This approach can contribute to accountability mechanisms for NCD prevention.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/s12889-016-2955-7
Field of Research 1117 Public Health And Health Services
111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920499 Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health) not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30083206

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Health and Social Development
Open Access Collection
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.