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Precarious decencies: negotiating creative (im)mortalities, in life, together

Pont, Antonia 2016, Precarious decencies: negotiating creative (im)mortalities, in life, together, Axon: creative explorations, no. 10, pp. 1-1.

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Title Precarious decencies: negotiating creative (im)mortalities, in life, together
Author(s) Pont, AntoniaORCID iD for Pont, Antonia orcid.org/0000-0001-5194-0789
Journal name Axon: creative explorations
Issue number 10
Start page 1
End page 1
Total pages 1
Publisher University of Canberra, Faculty of Arts and Design
Place of publication Canberra, A.C.T.
Publication date 2016-03
ISSN 1838-8973
Keyword(s) collaboration
practice
poetry
immortality
Patanjali
symposium
Summary This paper takes up the question of what might hinder the collaborative impulse among artists and specifically poets, and offers—as one possible answer—the complication posed by the urge of an artist for immortality, or for their (individual) name to live on. The paper begins by returning to a moment in Plato, namely that of the Symposium and its observations concerning the connection between poiesis (making) and a questing after immortality. Contrasting with what seems like Plato's broadly positive framing, the paper takes up a second reading of immortality (or the 'will-to-live') found in an early text of the Yogic canon, that of Patanjali's Yoga Sutras. In this second text, written somewhat later than Plato's, the will-to-live is framed otherwise, as one of five afflictions that can be 'made thin' by practice. The paper's wager is that, viewed in this way, as an affliction, the will-to-live (or urge for immortality) deserves consideration as a hindrance to the impulse towards collaboration. Noting, however, that in the poiesis of writing poetry, where there is both the making of things and the action of making things, this creative constellation always contains the tempering solution to its own inherent lures. Writing, although providing fuel for immortal appetites (due to what it makes), also works to temper the worst of this same impulse via the contribution of practice—as dedication, craft and community-as-practice. The practice of writing, therefore, is already at play, and can be emphasised explicitly for any poet or maker who also wants to be able to want to collaborate. The practice of writing, then, and its turn away from investments in identity, works to thin out the more destructive face of an urge for a dubious eternity that can eclipse our ability to work together creatively with others in this life.
Language eng
Field of Research 199999 Studies In Creative Arts and Writing not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970119 Expanding Knowledge through Studies of the Creative Arts and Writing
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2016, Antonia Pont
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30083208

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Communication and Creative Arts
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.