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Relationships of nicotianamine and other amino acids with nickel, zinc and iron in Thlaspi hyperaccumulators

Callahan, Damien L., Kolev, Spas D., O’Hair, Richard A.J., Salt, David E. and Baker, Alan J.M. 2007, Relationships of nicotianamine and other amino acids with nickel, zinc and iron in Thlaspi hyperaccumulators, New phytologist, vol. 176, no. 4, pp. 836-848, doi: 10.1111/j.1469-8137.2007.02216.x.

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Title Relationships of nicotianamine and other amino acids with nickel, zinc and iron in Thlaspi hyperaccumulators
Author(s) Callahan, Damien L.
Kolev, Spas D.
O’Hair, Richard A.J.
Salt, David E.
Baker, Alan J.M.
Journal name New phytologist
Volume number 176
Issue number 4
Start page 836
End page 848
Total pages 13
Publisher Wiley
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2007-12
ISSN 0028-646X
1469-8137
Keyword(s) amino acid
hyperaccumulator
liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry (LC-MS)
nickel
nicotianamine
Summary Experimental evidence suggests that nicotianamine (NA) is involved in the complexation of metal ions in some metal-hyperaccumulating plants. Closely-related nickel (Ni)- and zinc (Zn)-hyperaccumulating species were studied to determine whether a correlation exists between the Ni and Zn concentrations and NA in foliar tissues. A liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry (LC-MS) procedure was developed to quantify the NA and amino acid contents using the derivatizing agent 6-aminoquinolyl-N-hydroxysuccinimidyl carbamate. A strong correlation emerged between Ni and NA, but not between Zn and NA. Concentrations of NA and l-histidine (His) also increased in response to higher Ni concentrations in the hydroponic solution supplied to a serpentine population of Thlaspi caerulescens. An inversely proportional correlation was found between the iron (Fe) and Ni concentrations in the leaves. Correlations were also found between Zn and asparagine. The results obtained in this study suggest that NA is involved in hyperaccumulation of Ni but not Zn. The inverse proportionality between the Ni and Fe concentrations in the leaf may suggest that Ni and Fe compete for complexation to NA.
Language eng
DOI 10.1111/j.1469-8137.2007.02216.x
Field of Research 060705 Plant Physiology
060101 Analytical Biochemistry
06 Biological Sciences
07 Agricultural And Veterinary Sciences
Socio Economic Objective 970106 Expanding Knowledge in the Biological Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2007, Wiley
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30083229

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