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Correlates of gross motor competence in children and adolescents: a systematic review and meta-analysis

Barnett, Lisa M., Lai, Samuel K., Veldman, Sanne L.C., Hardy, Louise L., Cliff, Dylan P., Morgan, Philip J., Zask, Avigdor, Lubans, David R., Shultz, Sarah P., Ridgers, Nicola D., Rush, Elaine, Brown, Helen L. and Okely, Anthony D. 2016, Correlates of gross motor competence in children and adolescents: a systematic review and meta-analysis, Sports medicine, vol. 46, no. 11, pp. 1663-1688, doi: 10.1007/s40279-016-0495-z.

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Title Correlates of gross motor competence in children and adolescents: a systematic review and meta-analysis
Author(s) Barnett, Lisa M.ORCID iD for Barnett, Lisa M. orcid.org/0000-0002-9731-625X
Lai, Samuel K.
Veldman, Sanne L.C.
Hardy, Louise L.
Cliff, Dylan P.
Morgan, Philip J.
Zask, Avigdor
Lubans, David R.
Shultz, Sarah P.
Ridgers, Nicola D.ORCID iD for Ridgers, Nicola D. orcid.org/0000-0001-5713-3515
Rush, Elaine
Brown, Helen L.ORCID iD for Brown, Helen L. orcid.org/0000-0002-5460-3654
Okely, Anthony D.
Journal name Sports medicine
Volume number 46
Issue number 11
Start page 1663
End page 1688
Total pages 26
Publisher Springer
Place of publication Berlin, Germany
Publication date 2016-11
ISSN 0112-1642
1179-2035
Summary BACKGROUND: Gross motor competence confers health benefits, but levels in children and adolescents are low. While interventions can improve gross motor competence, it remains unclear which correlates should be targeted to ensure interventions are most effective, and for whom targeted and tailored interventions should be developed.

OBJECTIVE: The aim of this systematic review was to identify the potential correlates of gross motor competence in typically developing children and adolescents (aged 3-18 years) using an ecological approach.

METHODS: Motor competence was defined as gross motor skill competency, encompassing fundamental movement skills and motor coordination, but excluding motor fitness. Studies needed to assess a summary score of at least one aspect of motor competence (i.e., object control, locomotor, stability, or motor coordination). A structured electronic literature search was conducted in accordance with the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses statement. Six electronic databases (CINAHL Complete, ERIC, MEDLINE Complete, PsycINFO(®), Scopus and SPORTDiscus with Full Text) were searched from 1994 to 5 August 2014. Meta-analyses were conducted to determine the relationship between potential correlates and motor competency if at least three individual studies investigated the same correlate and also reported standardized regression coefficients.

RESULTS: A total of 59 studies were identified from 22 different countries, published between 1995 and 2014. Studies reflected the full range of age groups. The most examined correlates were biological and demographic factors. Age (increasing) was a correlate of children's motor competence. Weight status (healthy), sex (male) and socioeconomic background (higher) were consistent correlates for certain aspects of motor competence only. Physical activity and sport participation constituted the majority of investigations in the behavioral attributes and skills category. Whilst we found physical activity to be a positive correlate of skill composite and motor coordination, we also found indeterminate evidence for physical activity being a correlate of object control or locomotor skill competence. Few studies investigated cognitive, emotional and psychological factors, cultural and social factors or physical environment factors as correlates of motor competence.

CONCLUSION: This systematic review is the first that has investigated correlates of gross motor competence in children and adolescents. A strength is that we categorized correlates according to the specific ways motor competence has been defined and operationalized (object control, motor coordination, etc.), which enables us to have an understanding of what correlates assist what types of motor competence. Indeed our findings do suggest that evidence for some correlates differs according to how motor competence is operationalized.
Language eng
DOI 10.1007/s40279-016-0495-z
Field of Research 110699 Human Movement and Sports Science not elsewhere classified
1106 Human Movement And Sports Science
0913 Mechanical Engineering
1302 Curriculum And Pedagogy
Socio Economic Objective 920401 Behaviour and Health
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30083233

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.