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The functional and clinical outcomes of exercise training following a very low energy diet for severely obese women: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

Miller, Clint T., Fraser, Steve F., Selig, Steve E., Rice, Toni, Grima, Mariee, Straznicky, Nora E., Levinger, Itamar, Lambert, Elisabeth A., van den Hoek, Daniel J. and Dixon, John B. 2016, The functional and clinical outcomes of exercise training following a very low energy diet for severely obese women: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial, Trials, vol. 17, Article number: 125, pp. 1-12, doi: 10.1186/s13063-016-1232-5.

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Title The functional and clinical outcomes of exercise training following a very low energy diet for severely obese women: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial
Author(s) Miller, Clint T.ORCID iD for Miller, Clint T. orcid.org/0000-0001-7743-6986
Fraser, Steve F.ORCID iD for Fraser, Steve F. orcid.org/0000-0003-0202-9619
Selig, Steve E.
Rice, Toni
Grima, Mariee
Straznicky, Nora E.
Levinger, Itamar
Lambert, Elisabeth A.
van den Hoek, Daniel J.
Dixon, John B.
Journal name Trials
Volume number 17
Season Article number: 125
Start page 1
End page 12
Total pages 12
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2016-03-08
ISSN 1745-6215
Keyword(s) Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Medicine, Research & Experimental
Research & Experimental Medicine
Obesity
Exercise
Body composition
Fitness
Very low energy diet
TYPE-2 DIABETES-MELLITUS
FAT-FREE MASS
TRAIT ANXIETY INVENTORY
HIGH BLOOD-PRESSURE
PEAK OXYGEN-UPTAKE
QUALITY-OF-LIFE
WEIGHT-LOSS
PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY
CALORIC RESTRICTION
RISK-FACTORS
Summary BACKGROUND: Clinical practice guidelines globally recommend lifestyle modification including diet and exercise training as first-line treatment for obesity. The clinical benefits of exercise training in adults with obesity is well-documented; however, there is no strong evidence for the effectiveness of exercise training for weight loss in class II and class III obesity. The purpose of the randomised controlled trial described in this protocol article is to examine the effect of exercise training, in addition to a very low energy diet (VLED), in clinically severe obese women for changes in body composition, physical function, quality of life, and markers of cardiometabolic risk.

METHODS/DESIGN: Sixty women, aged 18-50 years with a body mass index (BMI) greater than 34.9 kg.m(2) and at least one obesity-related co-morbidity, will be recruited for this 12-month study. Participants will be randomised to either exercise plus energy restriction (n = 30), or energy restriction alone (n = 30). All participants will follow an energy-restricted individualised diet incorporating a VLED component. The exercise intervention group will also receive exercise by supervised aerobic and resistance training and a home-based exercise programme totalling 300 minutes per week. Primary outcome measures include body composition and aerobic fitness. Secondary outcome measures include: physical function, cardiometabolic risk factors, quality of life, physical activity, and mental health. All outcome measures will be conducted at baseline, 3, 6 and 12 months.

DISCUSSION: Previous research demonstrates various health benefits of including exercise training as part of a healthy lifestyle at all BMI ranges. Although clinical practice guidelines recommend exercise training as part of first-line treatment for overweight and obesity, there are few studies that demonstrate the effectiveness of exercise in class II and class III obesity. The study aims to determine whether the addition of exercise training to a VLED provides more favourable improvements in body composition, physical function, quality of life, and markers of cardiometabolic risk for women with clinically severe obesity, compared to VLED alone.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/s13063-016-1232-5
Field of Research 110699 Human Movement and Sports Science not elsewhere classified
1102 Cardiovascular Medicine And Haematology
1103 Clinical Sciences
Socio Economic Objective 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30083251

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.