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Learning the hang power clean: kinetic, kinematic, and technical changes in four weightlifting naive athletes

Haug, William B., Drinkwater, Eric J. and Chapman, Dale W. 2015, Learning the hang power clean: kinetic, kinematic, and technical changes in four weightlifting naive athletes, Journal of strength and conditioning research, vol. 29, no. 7, pp. 1766-1779, doi: 10.1519/JSC.0000000000000826.

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Title Learning the hang power clean: kinetic, kinematic, and technical changes in four weightlifting naive athletes
Author(s) Haug, William B.
Drinkwater, Eric J.
Chapman, Dale W.
Journal name Journal of strength and conditioning research
Volume number 29
Issue number 7
Start page 1766
End page 1779
Total pages 14
Publisher Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins
Place of publication Philadelphia, Pa.
Publication date 2015-07
ISSN 1533-4287
Summary The investment in learning required to reach benefit with weightlifting training is currently not well understood in elite athletes. The purpose of this investigation was to quantify changes in vertical jump power production and kinematic variables in hang power clean (HPC) performance during the learning process from a naive state in a multiple single-subject research design. Four elite athletes undertook HPC learning for approximately 20-30 minutes twice per week over a 169-day period. Changes in parameters of vertical power production during squat jump (SJ) and countermovement jump (CMJ) were monitored from baseline (day 0) and at 3 additional occasions. Hang power clean movement kinematics and bar path traces were monitored from day 35 and at 3 additional occasions particular to the individual's periodized training plan. Descriptive statistics were reported within athletes as mean ± SD. We observed a 14.1-35.7% (SJ) and a -14.4 to 20.5% (CMJ) gain in peak power across the 4 jump testing occasions with improvements over the first 4 weeks (SJ: 9.2-32.6%; CMJ: -2.91 to 20.79%). Changes in HPC movement kinematics and barbell path traces occurred for each athlete indicating a more rearward-directed center of pressure over the concentric phase, greater double knee bend during the transition phase, decreased maximal plantar flexion, and minimal vertical displacement of body mass with HPC learning. Considering the minimal investment of 4 weeks to achieve increases in vertical power production, the benefits of training with HPC justified the associated time costs for these 4 elite athletes.
Language eng
DOI 10.1519/JSC.0000000000000826
Field of Research 1106 Human Movement And Sports Science
Socio Economic Objective 929999 Health not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2015, Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30083260

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences
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