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Male hatchling production in sea turtles from one of the world's largest marine protected areas, the Chagos Archipelago

Esteban, Nicole, Laloë, Jacques-Olivier, Mortimer, Jeanne A, Guzman, Antenor N and Hays, Graeme 2016, Male hatchling production in sea turtles from one of the world's largest marine protected areas, the Chagos Archipelago, Scientific reports, vol. 6, pp. 1-8, doi: 10.1038/srep20339.

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Title Male hatchling production in sea turtles from one of the world's largest marine protected areas, the Chagos Archipelago
Author(s) Esteban, Nicole
Laloë, Jacques-Olivier
Mortimer, Jeanne A
Guzman, Antenor N
Hays, GraemeORCID iD for Hays, Graeme orcid.org/0000-0002-3314-8189
Journal name Scientific reports
Volume number 6
Start page 1
End page 8
Total pages 8
Publisher Nature Publishing Group
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2016-02-02
ISSN 2045-2322
2045-2322
Keyword(s) hawksbill turtles
Chelonia mydas)
climate change
Sand temperatures
hatchling sex ratios
Summary Sand temperatures at nest depths and implications for hatchling sex ratios of hawksbill turtles (Eretmochelys imbricata) and green turtles (Chelonia mydas) nesting in the Chagos Archipelago, Indian Ocean are reported and compared to similar measurements at rookeries in the Atlantic and Caribbean. During 2012-2014, temperature loggers were buried at depths and in beach zones representative of turtle nesting sites. Data collected for 12,546 days revealed seasonal and spatial patterns of sand temperature. Depth effects were minimal, perhaps modulated by shade from vegetation. Coolest and warmest temperatures were recorded in the sites heavily shaded in vegetation during the austral winter and in sites partially shaded in vegetation during summer respectively. Overall, sand temperatures were relatively cool during the nesting seasons of both species which would likely produce fairly balanced hatchling sex ratios of 53% and 63% male hatchlings, respectively, for hawksbill and green turtles. This result contrasts with the predominantly high female skew reported for offspring at most rookeries around the globe and highlights how local beach characteristics can drive incubation temperatures. Our evidence suggests that sites characterized by heavy shade associated with intact natural vegetation are likely to provide conditions suitable for male hatchling production in a warming world.
Language eng
DOI 10.1038/srep20339
Field of Research 060299 Ecology not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 960808 Marine Flora
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, Nature Publishing Group
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30083266

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Created: Thu, 13 Oct 2016, 08:16:23 EST

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