You are not logged in.

The use of traits to interpret responses to large scale - edge effects: a study of epigaeic beetle assemblages across a Eucalyptus forest and pine plantation edge

Evans, Maldwyn J, Banks, Sam C, Davies, Kendi F, Mcclenahan, Jeff, Melbourne, Brett and Driscoll, Don A 2016, The use of traits to interpret responses to large scale - edge effects: a study of epigaeic beetle assemblages across a Eucalyptus forest and pine plantation edge, Landscape ecology, vol. 31, no. 8, pp. 1-17, doi: 10.1007/s10980-016-0364-z.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Title The use of traits to interpret responses to large scale - edge effects: a study of epigaeic beetle assemblages across a Eucalyptus forest and pine plantation edge
Author(s) Evans, Maldwyn J
Banks, Sam C
Davies, Kendi F
Mcclenahan, Jeff
Melbourne, Brett
Driscoll, Don AORCID iD for Driscoll, Don A orcid.org/0000-0002-1560-5235
Journal name Landscape ecology
Volume number 31
Issue number 8
Start page 1
End page 17
Total pages 17
Publisher Springer
Place of publication Berlin, Germany
Publication date 2016-03-21
ISSN 1572-9761
1572-9761
Keyword(s) Biodiversity
Community ecology
Feeding-guild
Habitat fragmentation
Flightcapacity
Summary Context: Edge effects due to habitat loss and fragmentation have pervasive impacts on many natural ecosystems worldwide. Objective: We aimed to explore whether, in tandem with the resource-based model of edge effects, species feeding-guild and flight-capacity can help explain species responses to an edge. Methods: We used a two-sided edge gradient that extended from 1000 m into native Eucalyptus forest to 316 m into an exotic pine plantation. We used generalised additive models to examine the continuous responses of beetle species, feeding-guild species richness and flight-capable group species richness to the edge gradient and environmental covariates. Results: Phytophagous species richness was directly related to variation in vegetation along the edge gradient. There were more flight-capable species in Eucalyptus forest and more flightless species in exotic pine plantation. Many individual species exhibited multiple-peaked edge-profiles. Conclusions: The resource based model for edge effects can be used in tandem with traits such as feeding-guild and flight-capacity to understand drivers of large scale edge responses. Some trait-groups can show generalisable responses that can be linked with drivers such as vegetation richness and habitat structure. Many trait-group responses, however, are less generalisable and not explained by easily measured habitat variables. Difficulties in linking traits with resources along the edge could be due to unmeasured variation and indirect effects. Some species’ responses reached the limits of the edge gradient demonstrating the need to examine edge effects at large scales, such as kilometres.
Language eng
DOI 10.1007/s10980-016-0364-z
Field of Research 050207 Environmental Rehabilitation (excl Bioremediation)
050205 Environmental Management
Socio Economic Objective 970105 Expanding Knowledge in the Environmental Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, Springer
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30083273

Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 0 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 0 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 48 Abstract Views, 2 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Tue, 11 Oct 2016, 08:49:00 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.