Self-assembled core-satellite gold nanoparticle networks for ultrasensitive detection of chiral molecules by recognition tunneling current

Zhang, Yuanchao, Liu, Jingquan, Li, Da, Dai, Xing, Yan, Fuhua, Conlan, Xavier, Zhou, Ruhong, Barrow, Colin J., He, Jin, Wang, Xin and Yang, Wenrong 2016, Self-assembled core-satellite gold nanoparticle networks for ultrasensitive detection of chiral molecules by recognition tunneling current, ACS nano, vol. 10, pp. 5096-5103, doi: 10.1021/acsnano.6b00216.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Title Self-assembled core-satellite gold nanoparticle networks for ultrasensitive detection of chiral molecules by recognition tunneling current
Author(s) Zhang, Yuanchao
Liu, Jingquan
Li, Da
Dai, Xing
Yan, Fuhua
Conlan, XavierORCID iD for Conlan, Xavier orcid.org/0000-0003-0829-0551
Zhou, Ruhong
Barrow, Colin J.ORCID iD for Barrow, Colin J. orcid.org/0000-0002-2153-7267
He, Jin
Wang, Xin
Yang, WenrongORCID iD for Yang, Wenrong orcid.org/0000-0001-8815-1951
Journal name ACS nano
Volume number 10
Start page 5096
End page 5103
Total pages 8
Publisher American Chemical Society
Place of publication Washington, D.C.
Publication date 2016
ISSN 1936-086X
Keyword(s) biosensors
chiral molecule differentiation
chiral sensing
core satellite GNPs
molecular electronics
tunneling current recognition
Summary Chirality sensing is a very challenging task. Here, we report a method for ultrasensitive detection of chiral molecule l/d-carnitine based on changes in the recognition tunneling current across self-assembled core-satellite gold nanoparticle (GNP) networks. The recognition tunneling technique has been demonstrated to work at the single molecule level where the binding between the reader molecules and the analytes in a nanojunction. This process was observed to generate a unique and sensitive change in tunneling current, which can be used to identify the analytes of interest. The molecular recognition mechanism between amino acid l-cysteine and l/d-carnitine has been studied with the aid of SERS. The different binding strength between homo- or heterochiral pairs can be effectively probed by the copper ion replacement fracture. The device resistance was measured before and after the sequential exposures to l/d-carnitine and copper ions. The normalized resistance change was found to be extremely sensitive to the chirality of carnitine molecule. The results suggested that a GNP networks device optimized for recognition tunneling was successfully built and that such a device can be used for ultrasensitive detection of chiral molecules.
Language eng
DOI 10.1021/acsnano.6b00216
Field of Research 030302 Nanochemistry and Supramolecular Chemistry
Socio Economic Objective 970103 Expanding Knowledge in the Chemical Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, American Chemical Society
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30083319

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Life and Environmental Sciences
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 10 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 10 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 291 Abstract Views, 4 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Fri, 07 Oct 2016, 11:26:09 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.