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Occupational therapy in forensic psychiatry: Recent developments in our understandings (2007-2013)

Hitch, Danielle, Hii, QK and Davey, Ian 2016, Occupational therapy in forensic psychiatry: Recent developments in our understandings (2007-2013), British journal of occupational therapy, vol. 79, no. 4, pp. 197-205, doi: 10.1177/0308022615591018.

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Title Occupational therapy in forensic psychiatry: Recent developments in our understandings (2007-2013)
Author(s) Hitch, DanielleORCID iD for Hitch, Danielle orcid.org/0000-0003-2798-2246
Hii, QK
Davey, Ian
Journal name British journal of occupational therapy
Volume number 79
Issue number 4
Start page 197
End page 205
Total pages 9
Publisher Sage
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2016-04
ISSN 0308-0226
1477-6006
Keyword(s) mental health
criminal justice system
rehabilitation
offending
Summary Introduction: Occupational therapy in forensic settings has developed in recent decades, leading to an increasing amount of research being conducted in this field. There have been two previous attempts to provide overviews of this body of evidence and future directions for research; however, the rate of research has accelerated in recent years. This critical review addresses the following question: what evidence has been published about occupational therapy in forensic psychiatry over the past 7 years? Method: A mixed methods approach was adopted, with four databases and a search engine consulted (OTDBase, CINAHL, AMED, PSYCHInfo, Google Scholar). The inclusion criteria were: (a) articles published in peer reviewed journals since 2007 and (b) authored by at least one occupational therapist. Twenty-five studies were identified for review, and the four dimensions of occupation - doing, being, becoming and belonging - were used to provide a theoretical context for the subsequent discussion. Findings: The recent evidence base in forensic psychiatry focuses on doing and being, with fewer articles addressing becoming and belonging. Conclusion: This review has identified increasing numbers of studies about forensic occupational therapy, which may reflect growth in both interest and the worldwide workforce.
Language eng
DOI 10.1177/0308022615591018
Field of Research 1103 Clinical Sciences
170199 Psychology not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920499 Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health) not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2015, The Author
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30083349

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Health and Social Development
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