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Nutritional intervention to prevent weight gain in patients commenced on olanzapine: a randomized controlled trial

Evans, Sherryn, Newton, Richard and Higgins, Sally 2005, Nutritional intervention to prevent weight gain in patients commenced on olanzapine: a randomized controlled trial, Australian and New Zealand journal of psychiatry, vol. 39, no. 6, pp. 479-486, doi: 10.1111/j.1440-1614.2005.01607.x.

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Title Nutritional intervention to prevent weight gain in patients commenced on olanzapine: a randomized controlled trial
Author(s) Evans, Sherryn
Newton, Richard
Higgins, Sally
Journal name Australian and New Zealand journal of psychiatry
Volume number 39
Issue number 6
Start page 479
End page 486
Total pages 8
Publisher Wiley
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2005-06
ISSN 0004-8674
1440-1614
Keyword(s) antipsychotics
dietitian
nutrition
olanzapine
weight gain
Summary Objective: Olanzapine is the most commonly prescribed atypical antipsychotic medication in Australia. Research reports an average weight gain of between 4.5 and 7 kg in the 3 months following its commencement. Trying to minimize this weight gain in a population with an already high prevalence of obesity, mortality and morbidity is of clinical and social importance. This randomized controlled trial investigated the impact of individual nutrition education provided by a dietitian on weight gain in the 3 and 6 months following the commencement of olanzapine.


Method: Fifty-one individuals (29 females, 22 males) who had started on olanzapine in the previous 3 months (mean length of 27 days ± 20) were recruited through Peninsula Health Psychiatric Services and were randomly assigned to either the intervention (n = 29) or the control group (n = 22). Individuals in the intervention group received six 1 hour nutrition education sessions over a 3-month period. Weight, waist circumference, body mass index (BMI) and qualitative measures of exercise levels, quality of life, health and body image were collected at baseline at 3 and 6 months.


Results: After 3 months, the control group had gained significantly more weight than the treatment group (6.0 kg vs 2.0 kg, p ≤ 0.002). Weight gain of more than 7% of initial weight occurred in 64% of the control group compared to 13% of the treatment group. The control group's BMI increased significantly more than the treatment group's (2 kg/m2vs 0.7 kg/m2, p ≤ 0.03). The treatment group reported significantly greater improvements in moderate exercise levels, quality of life, health and body image compared to the controls. At 6 months, the control group continued to show significantly more weight gain since baseline than the treatment group (9.9 kg vs 2.0 kg, p ≤ 0.013) and consequently had significantly greater increases in BMI (3.2 kg/m2vs 0.8 kg/m2, p ≤ 0.017).
Language eng
DOI 10.1111/j.1440-1614.2005.01607.x
Field of Research 111199 Nutrition and Dietetics not elsewhere classified
11 Medical And Health Sciences
17 Psychology And Cognitive Sciences
Socio Economic Objective 920411 Nutrition
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2005, Wiley
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30083352

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences
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