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The acute physiological stress response to an emergency alarm and mobilization during the day and at night

Hall, Sarah J., Aisbett, Brad, Tait, Jamie L., Turner, Anne I., Ferguson, Sally A. and Main, Luana C. 2016, The acute physiological stress response to an emergency alarm and mobilization during the day and at night, Noise & health, vol. 18, no. 82, pp. 150-156, doi: 10.4103/1463-1741.181998.

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Title The acute physiological stress response to an emergency alarm and mobilization during the day and at night
Author(s) Hall, Sarah J.
Aisbett, BradORCID iD for Aisbett, Brad orcid.org/0000-0001-8077-0272
Tait, Jamie L.
Turner, Anne I.ORCID iD for Turner, Anne I. orcid.org/0000-0002-0682-2860
Ferguson, Sally A.
Main, Luana C.ORCID iD for Main, Luana C. orcid.org/0000-0002-9576-9466
Journal name Noise & health
Volume number 18
Issue number 82
Start page 150
End page 156
Total pages 7
Publisher Medknow Publications and Media
Place of publication Mumbai, India
Publication date 2016-05
ISSN 1463-1741
Summary The purpose of this study was to investigate the acute physiological stress response to an emergency alarm and mobilization during the day and at night. Sixteen healthy males aged 25 ± 4 years (mean ± SD) spent four consecutive days and nights in a sleep laboratory. This research used a within-participants design with repeated measures for time, alarm condition (alarm or control), and trial (day or night). When an alarm sounded, participants were required to mobilize immediately. Saliva samples for cortisol analysis were collected 0 min, 15 min, 30 min, 45 min, 60 min, 90 min, and 120 min after mobilization, and at corresponding times in control conditions. Heart rate was measured continuously throughout the study. Heart rate was higher in the day (F20,442 = 9.140, P < 0.001) and night (F23,459 = 8.356, P < 0.001) alarm conditions compared to the respective control conditions. There was no difference in saliva cortisol between day alarm and day control conditions. Cortisol was higher (F6,183 = 2.450, P < 0.001) following the night alarm and mobilization compared to the night control condition. The magnitude of difference in cortisol between night control and night alarm conditions was greater (F6,174 = 4.071, P < 0.001) than the magnitude of difference between the day control and day alarm conditions. The augmented heart rate response to the day and night alarms supports previous observations in field settings. Variations in the cortisol responses between conditions across the day and night may relate to differences in participants' ability to interpret the alarm when sleeping versus when awake.
Language eng
DOI 10.4103/1463-1741.181998
Field of Research 1117 Public Health And Health Services
111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920299 Health and Support Services not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, Noise & Health
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial Share Alike licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30083441

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.