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Should I and Can I?: a mixed methods study of clinician beliefs and attitudes in the management of lifestyle risk factors in primary health care

Laws, Rachel A., Kirby, Sue E., Powell Davies, Gawaine P., Williams, Anna M., Jayasinghe, Upali W., Amoroso, Cheryl and Harris, Mark F. 2008, Should I and Can I?: a mixed methods study of clinician beliefs and attitudes in the management of lifestyle risk factors in primary health care, BMC health services research, vol. 8, no. 1, Article Number : 44, pp. 1-10, doi: 10.1186/1472-6963-8-44.

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Title Should I and Can I?: a mixed methods study of clinician beliefs and attitudes in the management of lifestyle risk factors in primary health care
Author(s) Laws, Rachel A.ORCID iD for Laws, Rachel A. orcid.org/0000-0003-4328-1116
Kirby, Sue E.
Powell Davies, Gawaine P.
Williams, Anna M.
Jayasinghe, Upali W.
Amoroso, Cheryl
Harris, Mark F.
Journal name BMC health services research
Volume number 8
Issue number 1
Season Article Number : 44
Start page 1
End page 10
Total pages 10
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2008
ISSN 1472-6963
Summary Background
Primary health care (PHC) clinicians have an important role to play in addressing lifestyle risk factors for chronic diseases. However they intervene only rarely, despite the opportunities that arise within their routine clinical practice. Beliefs and attitudes have been shown to be associated with risk factor management practices, but little is known about this for PHC clinicians working outside general practice. The aim of this study was to explore the beliefs and attitudes of PHC clinicians about incorporating lifestyle risk factor management into their routine care and to examine whether these varied according to their self reported level of risk factor management.

Methods

A cross sectional survey was undertaken with PHC clinicians (n = 59) in three community health teams. Clinicians' beliefs and attitudes were also explored through qualitative interviews with a purposeful sample of 22 clinicians from the teams. Mixed methods analysis was used to compare beliefs and attitudes for those with high and low levels of self reported risk factor management.

Results
Role congruence, perceived client acceptability, beliefs about capabilities, perceived effectiveness and clinicians' own lifestyle were key themes related to risk factor management practices. Those reporting high levels of risk factor screening and intervention had different beliefs and attitudes to those PHC clinicians who reported lower levels.

Conclusion

PHC clinicians' level of involvement in risk factor management reflects their beliefs and attitudes about it. This provides insights into ways of intervening to improve the integration of behavioural risk factor management into routine practice.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/1472-6963-8-44
Field of Research 1117 Public Health And Health Services
0807 Library And Information Studies
Socio Economic Objective 920599 Specific Population Health (excl. Indigenous Health) not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2008, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30083467

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.