You are not logged in.

Barroom aggression among Australian men: associations with heavy episodic drinking, conformity to masculine norms, and personal and perceived peer approval of barroom aggression

Miller, Peter, Zinkiewicz, Lucille, Hayley, Alexa, Sonderlund, Anders, Litherland, Steven, Medew-Ewen, Tess, Wells, Samantha and Graham, Kathryn 2016, Barroom aggression among Australian men: associations with heavy episodic drinking, conformity to masculine norms, and personal and perceived peer approval of barroom aggression, Journal of dtudies on alcohol and drugs, vol. 77, no. 3, pp. 421-430, doi: 10.15288/jsad.2016.77.421.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Title Barroom aggression among Australian men: associations with heavy episodic drinking, conformity to masculine norms, and personal and perceived peer approval of barroom aggression
Author(s) Miller, PeterORCID iD for Miller, Peter orcid.org/0000-0002-6896-5437
Zinkiewicz, LucilleORCID iD for Zinkiewicz, Lucille orcid.org/0000-0002-1861-1673
Hayley, Alexa
Sonderlund, Anders
Litherland, Steven
Medew-Ewen, Tess
Wells, Samantha
Graham, Kathryn
Journal name Journal of dtudies on alcohol and drugs
Volume number 77
Issue number 3
Start page 421
End page 430
Total pages 10
Publisher Alcohol Research Documentation
Place of publication New Brunswick, N. J.
Publication date 2016
ISSN 1938-4114
Keyword(s) alcohol
aggression
masculinity
peer approval
personal approval
Science & Technology
Social Sciences
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Substance Abuse
Psychology
ALCOHOL-CONSUMPTION
COLLEGE DRINKING
INJUNCTIVE NORMS
ATTITUDES
BELIEFS
MODEL
BARS
INTOXICATION
INVENTORY
BEHAVIOR
Notes Objective: Research suggests that heavy episodic drinking (HED), perceived peer norms, and personal approval of aggression influence male barroom aggression (MBA). Qualitative research suggests that conformity to hegemonic masculine gender norms also influences MBA; however, quantitative research on the direct and indirect influence of masculinity on MBA is limited. This study tested the relationships between HED, conformity to masculine gender norms, and personal approval and peer approval of MBA on MBA perpetration, as well as the indirect effect of masculine norms on MBA via HED. Method:A convenience sample of Australian men (N = 322; mean age = 21.05 years, SD = 1.95; 76.9% university students) completed an online questionnaire, assessing HED and MBA over the previous year, and subscales of the Beliefs and Attitudes Towards Male Alcohol-Related Aggression Inventory and Conformity to Masculine Norms Inventory-46. Results: Negative binomial regression analyses found that, overall, HED, male peer approval, and personal approval of MBA directly predicted increased risk of verbal and physical MBA perpetration. Greater conformity to specific masculine norms also increased (Power Over Women) and decreased (Emotional Control, Heterosexual Self-Presentation) risk of MBA perpetration. The masculine norms Risk Taking, Playboy, and Emotional Control were found to be indirect predictors of MBA via HED. Conclusions: Risk of MBA perpetration is increased primarily by HED as a direct, but also mediating, predictor. Personal and male peer approval of MBA, and specific masculine norms, further increase this risk whereas other masculine norms appear protective.
Language eng
DOI 10.15288/jsad.2016.77.421
Field of Research 170199 Psychology not elsewhere classified
1117 Public Health And Health Services
1701 Psychology
Socio Economic Objective 970117 Expanding Knowledge in Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, Alcohol Research Documentation Inc.
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30083556

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Psychology
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 2 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 3 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 147 Abstract Views, 1 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Thu, 19 May 2016, 16:00:27 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.