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Effects of a community-based salt reduction program in a regional Australian population

Land, Mary-Anne, Wu, Jason H. Y., Selwyn, Adriana, Crino, Michelle, Woodward, Mark, Chalmers, John, Webster, Jacqui, Nowson, Caryl, Jeffery, Paul, Smith, Wayne, Flood, Victoria and Neal, Bruce 2016, Effects of a community-based salt reduction program in a regional Australian population, BMC public health, vol. 16, Article number: 388, pp. 1-11, doi: 10.1186/s12889-016-3064-3.

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Title Effects of a community-based salt reduction program in a regional Australian population
Author(s) Land, Mary-Anne
Wu, Jason H. Y.
Selwyn, Adriana
Crino, Michelle
Woodward, Mark
Chalmers, John
Webster, Jacqui
Nowson, CarylORCID iD for Nowson, Caryl orcid.org/0000-0001-6586-7965
Jeffery, Paul
Smith, Wayne
Flood, Victoria
Neal, Bruce
Journal name BMC public health
Volume number 16
Season Article number: 388
Start page 1
End page 11
Total pages 11
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2016-05
ISSN 1471-2458
Keyword(s) 24-hour urine
Cardiovascular disease prevention
Salt
Sodium
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Public, Environmental & Occupational Health
Summary BACKGROUND: Salt reduction is a public health priority but there are few studies testing the efficacy of plausible salt reduction programs.

METHODS: A multi-faceted, community-based salt reduction program using the Communication for Behavioral Impact framework was implemented in Lithgow, Australia. Single 24-h urine samples were obtained from 419 individuals at baseline (2011) and from 572 at follow-up (2014). Information about knowledge and behaviors relating to salt was also collected.

RESULTS: Survey participants were on average 56 years old and 58 % female. Mean salt intake estimated from 24-h urine samples fell from 8.8 g/day (SD = 3.6 g/day) in 2011 to 8.0 (3.6) g/day in 2014 (-0.80, 95 % confidence interval -1.2 to -0.3;p < 0.001). There were significant increases in the proportion of participants that knew the recommended upper limit of salt intake (18 % vs. 29 %; p < 0.001), knew the importance of salt reduction (64 % vs. 78 %; p < 0.001) and reported changing their behaviors to reduce their salt intake by using spices (5 % vs. 28 %; p < 0.001) and avoiding eating out (21 % vs. 34 %; p < 0.001). However, the proportions that checked food labels (30 % vs. 25 %; p = 0.02) fell, as did the numbers avoiding processed foods (44 % vs. 35 %; p = 0.006). Twenty-six percent reported using salt substitute at the end of the intervention period and 90 % had heard about the program. Findings were robust to multivariable adjustment.

CONCLUSIONS: Implementation of this multi-faceted community-based program was associated with a ~10 % reduction in salt consumption in an Australian regional town. These findings highlight the potential of well-designed health promotion programs to compliment other population-based strategies to bring about much-needed reductions in salt consumption.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/s12889-016-3064-3
Field of Research 111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified
1117 Public Health And Health Services
Socio Economic Objective 920499 Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health) not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, Land et al.
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30083611

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.