Culture shock and reverse culture shock: the moderating role of cultural intelligence in international students' adaptation

Presbitero, Alfred 2016, Culture shock and reverse culture shock: the moderating role of cultural intelligence in international students' adaptation, International journal of intercultural relations, vol. 53, pp. 28-38, doi: 10.1016/j.ijintrel.2016.05.004.

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Title Culture shock and reverse culture shock: the moderating role of cultural intelligence in international students' adaptation
Author(s) Presbitero, AlfredORCID iD for Presbitero, Alfred orcid.org/0000-0002-3154-9026
Journal name International journal of intercultural relations
Volume number 53
Start page 28
End page 38
Total pages 11
Publisher Elsevier
Place of publication Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Publication date 2016-07
ISSN 0147-1767
Keyword(s) culture shock
reverse culture shock
cultural intelligence
psychological adaptation
sociocultural adaptation
Social Sciences
Psychology, Social
Social Sciences, Interdisciplinary
Sociology
Psychology
Social Sciences - Other Topics
ACCULTURATION
ADJUSTMENT
SATISFACTION
STRATEGIES
EDUCATION
NETWORKS
Summary This study extends previous research by examining the role of cultural intelligence (CQ) in both culture shock and reverse culture shock. Specifically, this study asserts that CQ acts as a moderating mechanism that lessens the negative effects of both culture shock and reverse culture shock on psychological and sociocultural adaptation among international students. Two studies were conducted in Australia to test these assertions. Study 1 (n = 189) was participated in by new international students. An online survey was set up and disseminated. Results indicated that culture shock is significantly but negatively related to both psychological and sociocultural adaptation. In addition, results demonstrated that CQ moderates the relationship by lessening the impact of culture shock on students’ psychological and sociocultural adaptation. Study 2 (n = 123) was participated in by international students who had recently graduated and returned to their home countries. An online survey was also set up and disseminated. Results indicated that reverse culture shock is significantly but negatively related to both psychological and sociocultural adaptation. CQ also served as a moderator in lessening the impact of reverse culture shock on both forms of adaptation.
Language eng
DOI 10.1016/j.ijintrel.2016.05.004
Field of Research 150308 International Business
1608 Sociology
1701 Psychology
Socio Economic Objective 970115 Expanding Knowledge in Commerce
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, Elsevier Ltd.
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30083665

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Business and Law
Department of Management
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