Immune-microbiota interactions: dysbiosis as a global health issue

Logan, Alan C., Jacka, Felice N. and Prescott, Susan L. 2016, Immune-microbiota interactions: dysbiosis as a global health issue, Current allergy and asthma reports, vol. 16, no. 13, pp. 1-9, doi: 10.1007/s11882-015-0590-5.

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Title Immune-microbiota interactions: dysbiosis as a global health issue
Author(s) Logan, Alan C.
Jacka, Felice N.ORCID iD for Jacka, Felice N. orcid.org/0000-0002-9825-0328
Prescott, Susan L.
Journal name Current allergy and asthma reports
Volume number 16
Issue number 13
Start page 1
End page 9
Total pages 9
Publisher Springer
Place of publication New York, N.Y.
Publication date 2016-02
ISSN 1534-6315
Keyword(s) Allergic disease
Early-life nutrition
Immune development
Microbiome
Neurodevelopment
Obesity
Pregnancy
Probiotics
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Allergy
Immunology
INFLAMMATORY NONCOMMUNICABLE DISEASES
GUT MICROBIOTA
ATOPIC SENSITIZATION
MEDITERRANEAN DIET
ENVIRONMENTAL-INFLUENCES
INTESTINAL PERMEABILITY
ALLERGIC SENSITIZATION
TRANSPOSABLE ELEMENTS
EPIGENETIC REGULATION
AIRWAY INFLAMMATION
Summary Throughout evolution, microbial genes and metabolites have become integral to virtually all aspects of host physiology, metabolism and even behaviour. New technologies are revealing sophisticated ways in which microbial communities interface with the immune system, and how modern environmental changes may be contributing to the rapid rise of inflammatory noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) through declining biodiversity. The implications of the microbiome extend to virtually every branch of medicine, biopsychosocial and environmental sciences. Similarly, the impact of changes at the immune-microbiota interface are directly relevant to broader discussions concerning rapid urbanization, antibiotics, agricultural practices, environmental pollutants, highly processed foods/beverages and socioeconomic disparities--all implicated in the NCD pandemic. Here, we make the argument that dysbiosis (life in distress) is ongoing at a micro- and macro-scale and that as a central conduit of health and disease, the immune system and its interface with microbiota is a critical target in overcoming the health challenges of the twenty-first century.
Language eng
DOI 10.1007/s11882-015-0590-5
Field of Research 119999 Medical and Health Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, Springer
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30083749

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Medicine
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