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Social values and species conservation: the case of Baudin's and Carnaby's black-cockatoos

Ainsworth, Gillian B., Aslin, Heather J., Weston, Michael A. and Garnett, Stephen T. 2016, Social values and species conservation: the case of Baudin's and Carnaby's black-cockatoos, Environmental conservation, vol. 43, no. 3, irstView, pp. 294-305, doi: 10.1017/S0376892916000126.

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Title Social values and species conservation: the case of Baudin's and Carnaby's black-cockatoos
Author(s) Ainsworth, Gillian B.
Aslin, Heather J.
Weston, Michael A.ORCID iD for Weston, Michael A. orcid.org/0000-0002-8717-0410
Garnett, Stephen T.
Journal name Environmental conservation
Volume number 43
Issue number 3
Season irstView
Start page 294
End page 305
Total pages 12
Publisher Cambridge Univeristy Press
Place of publication Cambridge, Eng.
Publication date 2016-09
ISSN 0376-8929
1469-4387
Keyword(s) attitudes
Australia
birds
black-cockatoo
conservation effort
threatened species
Summary We investigated how the socio–political and ecological environment are associated with the conservation management strategies for two rare, endemic and almost identical Australian white-tailed black-cockatoos: Baudin's (Calyptorhynchus baudinii) and Carnaby's black-cockatoo (C. latirostris). Substantially less investment and action has occurred for Baudin's black-cockatoo. Interviews with key informants revealed that this disparity has probably arisen because Baudin's black-cockatoo has long been considered a pest to the apple industry, lives primarily in tall forests and has had little research undertaken on its biology and threats. By contrast, Carnaby's black-cockatoo has been the subject of one of the longest running research projects in Australia, is highly visible within the urban environment and does not appear to affect the livelihoods of any strong stakeholder group. We suggest the social context within which recovery efforts occur could be an important determinant in species persistence. We argue that social research is fundamental to a better understanding of the nature of efforts to conserve particular species, the factors associated with these efforts and their likelihood of success.
Language eng
DOI 10.1017/S0376892916000126
Field of Research 050202 Conservation and Biodiversity
050205 Environmental Management
060207 Population Ecology
Socio Economic Objective 970105 Expanding Knowledge in the Environmental Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2016, Foundation for Environmental Conservation
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30083772

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