Fibromyalgia and bipolar disorder: emerging epidemiological associations and shared pathophysiology

Bortolato, B., Berk, M., Maes, M., McIntyre, R.S. and Carvalho, A.F. 2016, Fibromyalgia and bipolar disorder: emerging epidemiological associations and shared pathophysiology, Current molecular medicine, vol. 16, no. 2, pp. 119-136, doi: 10.2174/1566524016666160126144027.

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Title Fibromyalgia and bipolar disorder: emerging epidemiological associations and shared pathophysiology
Author(s) Bortolato, B.
Berk, M.ORCID iD for Berk, M. orcid.org/0000-0002-5554-6946
Maes, M.
McIntyre, R.S.
Carvalho, A.F.
Journal name Current molecular medicine
Volume number 16
Issue number 2
Start page 119
End page 136
Total pages 18
Publisher Bentham Science Publishers
Place of publication The Netherlands, Amsterdam
Publication date 2016-02
ISSN 1875-5666
Keyword(s) Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Medicine, Research & Experimental
Research & Experimental Medicine
Bipolar disorder
fibromyalgia
inflammation
oxidative stress
brain-derived neurotrophic factor
hypothalamic-pituitary adrenal axis
neuroimaging
pathophysiology
psychiatry
neurology
SEROTONIN TRANSPORTER GENE
CHRONIC-FATIGUE-SYNDROME
PITUITARY-ADRENAL AXIS
QUALITY-OF-LIFE
C-REACTIVE PROTEIN
ANTERIOR CINGULATE CORTEX
PLACEBO-CONTROLLED TRIAL
CHRONIC WIDESPREAD PAIN
VITAMIN-D DEFICIENCY
NEUROTROPHIC FACTOR
Summary Fibromyalgia (FM) is a prevalent disorder defined by the presence of chronic widespread pain in association with fatigue, sleep disturbances and cognitive dysfunction. Recent studies indicate that bipolar spectrum disorders frequently co-occur in individuals with FM. Furthermore, shared pathophysiological mechanisms anticipate remarkable phenomenological similarities between FM and BD. A comprehensive search of the English literature was carried out in the Pubmed/MEDLINE database through May 10th, 2015 to identify unique references pertaining to the epidemiology and shared pathophysiology between FM and bipolar disorder (BD). Overlapping neural circuits may underpin parallel clinical manifestations of both disorders. Fibromyalgia and BD are both characterized by functional abnormalities in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, higher levels of inflammatory mediators, oxidative and nitrosative stress as well as mitochondrial dysfunction. An over-activation of the kynurenine pathway in both illnesses drives tryptophan away from the production of serotonin and melatonin, leading to affective symptoms, circadian rhythm disturbances and abnormalities in pain processing. In addition, both disorders are associated with impaired neuroplasticity (e.g., altered brain-derived neurotrophic factor signaling). The recognition of the symptomatic and pathophysiological overlapping between FM and bipolar spectrum disorders has relevant etiological, clinical and therapeutic implications that deserve future research consideration.
Language eng
DOI 10.2174/1566524016666160126144027
Field of Research 110319 Psychiatry (incl Psychotherapy)
0304 Medicinal And Biomolecular Chemistry
1115 Pharmacology And Pharmaceutical Sciences
Socio Economic Objective 920410 Mental Health
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, Bentham Science Publishers
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30083781

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Medicine
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