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A qualitative study of the infant feeding beliefs and behaviours of mothers with low educational attainment

Russell, Catherine Georgina, Taki, Sarah, Azadi, Leva, Campbell, Karen J., Laws, Rachel, Elliott, Rosalind and Denney-Wilson, Elizabeth 2016, A qualitative study of the infant feeding beliefs and behaviours of mothers with low educational attainment, BMC pediatrics, vol. 16, Article Number : 69, pp. 1-14, doi: 10.1186/s12887-016-0601-2.

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Title A qualitative study of the infant feeding beliefs and behaviours of mothers with low educational attainment
Author(s) Russell, Catherine Georgina
Taki, Sarah
Azadi, Leva
Campbell, Karen J.ORCID iD for Campbell, Karen J. orcid.org/0000-0002-4499-3396
Laws, RachelORCID iD for Laws, Rachel orcid.org/0000-0003-4328-1116
Elliott, Rosalind
Denney-Wilson, Elizabeth
Journal name BMC pediatrics
Volume number 16
Season Article Number : 69
Start page 1
End page 14
Total pages 14
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2016
ISSN 1471-2431
Keyword(s) Feeding behaviour
Infant
Mothers
Pediatric obesity
Vulnerable populations
Weight gain
Summary BACKGROUND: Infancy is an important period for the promotion of healthy eating, diet and weight. However little is known about how best to engage caregivers of infants in healthy eating programs. This is particularly true for caregivers, infants and children from socioeconomically disadvantaged backgrounds who experience greater rates of overweight and obesity yet are more challenging to reach in health programs. Behaviour change interventions targeting parent-infant feeding interactions are more likely to be effective if assumptions about what needs to change for the target behaviours to occur are identified. As such we explored the precursors of key obesity promoting infant feeding practices in mothers with low educational attainment.

METHODS: One-on-one semi-structured telephone interviews were developed around the Capability Opportunity Motivation Behaviour (COM-B) framework and applied to parental feeding practices associated with infant excess or healthy weight gain. The target behaviours and their competing alternatives were (a) initiating breastfeeding/formula feeding, (b) prolonging breastfeeding/replacing breast milk with formula, (c) best practice formula preparation/sub-optimal formula preparation, (d) delaying the introduction of solid foods until around six months of age/introducing solids earlier than four months of age, and (e) introducing healthy first foods/introducing unhealthy first foods, and (f) feeding to appetite/use of non-nutritive (i.e., feeding for reasons other than hunger) feeding. The participants' education level was used as the indicator of socioeconomic disadvantage. Two researchers independently undertook thematic analysis.

RESULTS: Participants were 29 mothers of infants aged 2-11 months. The COM-B elements of Social and Environmental Opportunity, Psychological Capability, and Reflective Motivation were the key elements identified as determinants of a mother's likelihood to adopt the healthy target behaviours although the relative importance of each of the COM-B factors varied with each of the target feeding behaviours.

CONCLUSIONS: Interventions targeting healthy infant feeding practices should be tailored to the unique factors that may influence mothers' various feeding practices, taking into account motivational and social influences.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/s12887-016-0601-2
Field of Research 1114 Paediatrics And Reproductive Medicine
Socio Economic Objective 920501 Child Health
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30083792

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences
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Created: Mon, 30 May 2016, 11:35:53 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.