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Tantalus and the tyranny of territory : pursuing the dream of parity in rural and metropolitan population health outcomes through primary health care programs

Harvey, Peter 2004, Tantalus and the tyranny of territory : pursuing the dream of parity in rural and metropolitan population health outcomes through primary health care programs, Australian journal of primary health, vol. 10, no. 3, pp. 83-88, doi: 10.1071/PY04051.

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Title Tantalus and the tyranny of territory : pursuing the dream of parity in rural and metropolitan population health outcomes through primary health care programs
Author(s) Harvey, Peter
Journal name Australian journal of primary health
Volume number 10
Issue number 3
Start page 83
End page 88
Total pages 6
Publisher CSIRO Publishing
Place of publication Clayton, Vic.
Publication date 2004
ISSN 1448-7527
1836-7399
Keyword(s) rural health
isolation
equity
primary health
economics
Summary Many health professionals and rural health academics are motivated by the challenge of achieving equitable access to health care in rural communities with the implicit vision that fairer access to services might ultimately lead to more equitable health outcomes for people living in rural and remote settings. The purpose of this paper is to put the issue of rural and urban health outcome parity into perspective and assess recent progress towards achieving the ultimate goal of improving rural health status. I will also explore ways in which rural communities might increase their access to and use of primary health care revenue in the future to improve community health outcomes. While some improvements have been achieved across the rural health system in recent times, the fundamental problem of maintaining infrastructure to service community needs in rural areas remains as daunting as ever. Extensive evidence has now been assembled to show that rural people generally enjoy a much lower standard of health care, health outcomes and life expectancy than their urban cousins. The question underlying all of this evidence, however, is... must this always be so? Is it possible to redress the current inequities between rural and urban populations and could new primary health care initiatives, such as the Enhanced Primary Care (EPC) program, be vehicles for achieving more equitable health care arrangements and health outcomes for people living in rural communities?
Language eng
DOI 10.1071/PY04051
Field of Research 111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920499 Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health) not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2004, La Trobe University
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30083856

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Medicine
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