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The relation between local and global influence of individuals in scale-free networks

Wen, Sheng, Jiang, Jiaojiao, Majbouri Yazdi, Kasra, Xiang, Yang and Zhou, Wanlei 2015, The relation between local and global influence of individuals in scale-free networks, in SOCIALSEC 2015: Proceedings of the International Symposium on Security and Privacy in Social Networks and Big Data, IEEE, Piscataway, N.J., pp. 80-84, doi: 10.1109/SocialSec2015.20.

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Title The relation between local and global influence of individuals in scale-free networks
Author(s) Wen, Sheng
Jiang, Jiaojiao
Majbouri Yazdi, Kasra
Xiang, YangORCID iD for Xiang, Yang orcid.org/0000-0001-5252-0831
Zhou, WanleiORCID iD for Zhou, Wanlei orcid.org/0000-0002-1680-2521
Conference name Security and Privacy in Social Networks and Big Data. International Symposium (2015 : Hangzhou, China)
Conference location Hangzhou, China
Conference dates 16-18 Nov. 2015
Title of proceedings SOCIALSEC 2015: Proceedings of the International Symposium on Security and Privacy in Social Networks and Big Data
Publication date 2015
Start page 80
End page 84
Total pages 5
Publisher IEEE
Place of publication Piscataway, N.J.
Summary Large-degree nodes in scale-free networks are normally responsible for large cascades of epidemics. However, recent research shows small-degree nodes can also produce large-scale epidemics in the real world. In this letter, we investigate the relation between local and global influence of individuals in scale-free network in order to theoretically explain this real-world phenomenon. The local influence of an individual corresponds to the node degree, and the global influence of an individual reflects the expected number of individuals directly or indirectly influenced by this individual in epidemics. We formalize the later as the novel epidemic betweenness concept, to mathematically estimate the global influence of individuals. Our analysis shows that the global influence follows power-law distributions in scale-free networks. We also observe that the average global influence of individuals is power-law to the degree of nodes, which well explains the reason why large-degree nodes are more likely to produce large cascades of epidemics. In addition, we discover that some smalldegree nodes also possess large global influence in terms of epidemics betweenness. This well explains the counter-intuitive phenomenon in recent research.
ISBN 9781467384209
Language eng
DOI 10.1109/SocialSec2015.20
Field of Research 080501 Distributed and Grid Systems
Socio Economic Objective 970108 Expanding Knowledge in the Information and Computing Sciences
HERDC Research category E1 Full written paper - refereed
ERA Research output type E Conference publication
Copyright notice ©2015, IEEE
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30083982

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: School of Information Technology
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