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Low-frequency brain stimulation to the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex increases the negative impact of social exclusion among those high in personal distress

Fitzgibbon, Bernadette M., Kirkovski, Melissa, Bailey, Neil Wayne, Thomson, Richard Hilton, Eisenberger, Naomi, Enticott, Peter G. and Fitzgerald, Paul Bernard 2016, Low-frequency brain stimulation to the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex increases the negative impact of social exclusion among those high in personal distress, Social neuroscience, In press, pp. 1-5, doi: 10.1080/17470919.2016.1166154.

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Title Low-frequency brain stimulation to the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex increases the negative impact of social exclusion among those high in personal distress
Author(s) Fitzgibbon, Bernadette M.
Kirkovski, Melissa
Bailey, Neil Wayne
Thomson, Richard Hilton
Eisenberger, Naomi
Enticott, Peter G.
Fitzgerald, Paul Bernard
Journal name Social neuroscience
Season In press
Start page 1
End page 5
Total pages 5
Publisher Taylor & Francis
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2016-03-28
ISSN 1747-0919
1747-0927
Summary The dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) is thought to play a key role in the cognitive control of emotion and has therefore, unsurprisingly, been implicated in the regulation of physical pain perception. This brain region may also influence the experience of social pain, which has been shown to activate similar neural networks as seen in response to physical pain. Here, we applied sham or active low-frequency (1 Hz) repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) to the left DLPFC, previously shown to exert bilateral effects in pain perception, in healthy participants. Following stimulation, participants played the “Cyberball Task”; an online ball-tossing game in which the subject participant is included or excluded. Compared to sham, rTMS did not modulate behavioural response to social exclusion. However, within the active rTMS group only, greater trait personal distress was related to enhanced negative outcomes to social exclusion. These results add further support to the notion that the effect of brain stimulation is not homogenous across individuals, and indicates the need to consider baseline individual differences when assessing response to brain stimulation. This seems particularly relevant in social neuroscience investigations, where trait factors may have a meaningful effect.
Language eng
DOI 10.1080/17470919.2016.1166154
Field of Research 1109 Neurosciences
1702 Cognitive Science
1701 Psychology
Socio Economic Objective 929999 Health not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, Taylor & Francis
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30083988

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Psychology
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