You are not logged in.
Openly accessible

Reversing diet-induced metabolic dysregulation by diet switching leads to altered hepatic de novo lipogenesis and glycerolipid synthesis

Kowalski, Greg M., Hamley, Steven, Selathurai, Ahrathy, Kloehn, Joachim, De Souza, David P., O’Callaghan, Sean, Nijagal, Brunda, Tull, Dedreia L., McConville, Malcolm J. and Bruce, Clinton R. 2016, Reversing diet-induced metabolic dysregulation by diet switching leads to altered hepatic de novo lipogenesis and glycerolipid synthesis, Scientific reports, vol. 6, Article number: 27541, pp. 1-10, doi: 10.1038/srep27541.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
kowalski-reversingdietinduced-2016.pdf Published version application/pdf 1.40MB 12

Title Reversing diet-induced metabolic dysregulation by diet switching leads to altered hepatic de novo lipogenesis and glycerolipid synthesis
Author(s) Kowalski, Greg M.ORCID iD for Kowalski, Greg M. orcid.org/0000-0002-1599-017X
Hamley, Steven
Selathurai, AhrathyORCID iD for Selathurai, Ahrathy orcid.org/0000-0003-2349-3496
Kloehn, Joachim
De Souza, David P.
O’Callaghan, Sean
Nijagal, Brunda
Tull, Dedreia L.
McConville, Malcolm J.
Bruce, Clinton R.ORCID iD for Bruce, Clinton R. orcid.org/0000-0002-0515-3343
Journal name Scientific reports
Volume number 6
Season Article number: 27541
Start page 1
End page 10
Total pages 10
Publisher Nature Publishing Group
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2016-06
ISSN 2045-2322
Summary In humans, low-energy diets rapidly reduce hepatic fat and improve/normalise glycemic control. Due to difficulties in obtaining human liver, little is known about changes to the lipid species and pathway fluxes that occur under these conditions. Using a combination of stable isotope, and targeted metabolomic approaches we investigated the acute (7–9 days) hepatic effects of switching high-fat high-sucrose diet (HFD) fed obese mice back to a chow diet. Upon the switch, energy intake was reduced, resulting in reductions of fat mass and hepatic triacyl- and diacylglycerol. However, these parameters were still elevated compared to chow fed mice, thus representing an intermediate phenotype. Nonetheless, glucose intolerance and hyperinsulinemia were completely normalized. The diet reversal resulted in marked reductions in hepatic de novo lipogenesis when compared to the chow and HFD groups. Compared with HFD, glycerolipid synthesis was reduced in the reversal animals, however it remained elevated above that of chow controls, indicating that despite experiencing a net loss in lipid stores, the liver was still actively esterifying available fatty acids at rates higher than that in chow control mice. This effect likely promotes the re-esterification of excess free fatty acids released from the breakdown of adipose depots during the weight loss period.
Language eng
DOI 10.1038/srep27541
Field of Research 111603 Systems Physiology
Socio Economic Objective 920104 Diabetes
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Grant ID 1023570
Copyright notice ©2016, Nature Publishing Group
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30084083

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences
Open Access Collection
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 3 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 3 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 82 Abstract Views, 12 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Wed, 08 Jun 2016, 09:27:45 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.