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Doing the counter-regulation shuffle: the importance of flexibility and hunger for predicting food consumption following a preload

Broadbent, Jaclyn, Fuller-Tyszkiewicz, Matthew, Dennerstein, Michelle, Greenwood, Jesse Alexander, Hancock, Naomi, Thavapalan, Nithyyaa and White, Melissa 2016, Doing the counter-regulation shuffle: the importance of flexibility and hunger for predicting food consumption following a preload, Obesity research & clinical practice, vol. 10, no. 6, November-December, pp. 617-623, doi: 10.1016/j.orcp.2016.05.006.

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Title Doing the counter-regulation shuffle: the importance of flexibility and hunger for predicting food consumption following a preload
Author(s) Broadbent, JaclynORCID iD for Broadbent, Jaclyn orcid.org/0000-0003-4045-2039
Fuller-Tyszkiewicz, MatthewORCID iD for Fuller-Tyszkiewicz, Matthew orcid.org/0000-0003-1145-6057
Dennerstein, Michelle
Greenwood, Jesse Alexander
Hancock, Naomi
Thavapalan, Nithyyaa
White, Melissa
Journal name Obesity research & clinical practice
Volume number 10
Issue number 6
Season November-December
Start page 617
End page 623
Total pages 7
Publisher Elsevier
Place of publication Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Publication date 2016-11
ISSN 1871-403X
Keyword(s) Preload
Restraint
Food consumption
Hunger level
Counterregulation
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Endocrinology & Metabolism
Nutrition & Dietetics
EATING BEHAVIOR
DIETARY RESTRAINT
OBESITY EPIDEMIC
TENDENCY
EATERS
DISINHIBITION
Summary ObjectivesThis study utilised the preload paradigm to evaluate whether trait-like dieting attitudes and behaviours (dietary restraint and flexibility in dieting rules) and context-specific factors (negative mood and hunger) predict food consumption among male and female participants.MethodsFollowing a high calorie preload, 79 participants aged 18–40 completed a deceptive taste test in which they were encouraged to eat as much of the taste test foods as desired, and this ad libitum intake was measured.ResultsAlthough each predictor (except negative mood) predicted consumption when tested individually, regression analyses revealed that dieting flexibility and current hunger were the strongest unique predictors of intake. Mood failed to directly predict food consumption, nor did it moderate the relationship between restraint and food intake.ConclusionCollectively, findings suggest that emphasis on dietary restraint in preload studies may be misplaced, as other proximal and stable factors may better predict food consumption.
Language eng
DOI 10.1016/j.orcp.2016.05.006
Field of Research 170106 Health, Clinical and Counselling Psychology
Socio Economic Objective 970117 Expanding Knowledge in Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, Elsevier
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30084084

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Psychology
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Created: Fri, 19 Aug 2016, 15:19:51 EST

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