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Single pulse TMS-EEG reveals no electrophysiological abnormality in adults with high-functioning Autism Spectrum Disorder

Kirkovski, Melissa, Rogasch, Nigel C., Saeki, Takashi, Fitzgibbon, Bernadette M., Enticott, Peter G. and Fitzgerald, Paul B. 2016, Single pulse TMS-EEG reveals no electrophysiological abnormality in adults with high-functioning Autism Spectrum Disorder, Journal of child and adolescent psychopharmacology, vol. 26, no. 7, pp. 606-616, doi: 10.1089/cap.2015.0181.

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Title Single pulse TMS-EEG reveals no electrophysiological abnormality in adults with high-functioning Autism Spectrum Disorder
Author(s) Kirkovski, MelissaORCID iD for Kirkovski, Melissa orcid.org/0000-0003-3395-8525
Rogasch, Nigel C.
Saeki, Takashi
Fitzgibbon, Bernadette M.
Enticott, Peter G.ORCID iD for Enticott, Peter G. orcid.org/0000-0002-6638-951X
Fitzgerald, Paul B.
Journal name Journal of child and adolescent psychopharmacology
Volume number 26
Issue number 7
Start page 606
End page 616
Total pages 11
Publisher Mary Ann Liebert
Place of publication New Rochelle, N.Y.
Publication date 2016-06
ISSN 1044-5463
1557-8992
Summary  Objective: Neuroimaging and electrophysiological research have revealed a range of neural abnormalities in autism spectrum disorder (ASD), but a comprehensive understanding remains elusive. We utilized a novel methodology among individuals with ASD and matched controls, combining transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) with concurrent electroencephalogram (EEG) recording (TMS-EEG) to explore cortical function and connectivity in three sites implicated in the neuropathophysiology of ASD (dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, primary motor cortex, and temporoparietal junction). As there is evidence for neurobiological gender differences in ASD, we also examined the influence of biological sex.

Methods: TMS pulses were applied to each of the three sites (right lateralized) during 20-channel EEG recording.

Results: We did not identify any differences in the EEG response to TMS between ASD and control groups. This finding remained when data were stratified by sex. Nevertheless, traits and characteristics associated with ASD were correlated with the neurophysiological response to TMS.

Conclusion: While TMS-EEG did not appear to clarify the neuropathophysiology of ASD, the relationships identified between the neurophysiological response to TMS and clinical characteristics warrant further investigation.
Language eng
DOI 10.1089/cap.2015.0181
Field of Research 170101 Biological Psychology (Neuropsychology, Psychopharmacology, Physiological Psychology)
110903 Central Nervous System
110319 Psychiatry (incl Psychotherapy)
Socio Economic Objective 920410 Mental Health
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, Mary Ann Liebert
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30084092

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Psychology
Centre for Mental Health and Wellbeing Research
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