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Preliminary efficacy and feasibility of embedding high intensity interval training into the school day: A pilot randomized controlled trial

Costigan, S. A., Eather, N., Plotnikoff, R. C., Taaffe, D. R., Pollock, E., Kennedy, S. G. and Lubans, D. R. 2015, Preliminary efficacy and feasibility of embedding high intensity interval training into the school day: A pilot randomized controlled trial, Preventive medicine reports, vol. 2, pp. 973-979, doi: 10.1016/j.pmedr.2015.11.001.

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Title Preliminary efficacy and feasibility of embedding high intensity interval training into the school day: A pilot randomized controlled trial
Author(s) Costigan, S. A.ORCID iD for Costigan, S. A. orcid.org/0000-0003-2566-3276
Eather, N.
Plotnikoff, R. C.
Taaffe, D. R.
Pollock, E.
Kennedy, S. G.
Lubans, D. R.
Journal name Preventive medicine reports
Volume number 2
Start page 973
End page 979
Total pages 7
Publisher Elsevier
Place of publication Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Publication date 2015-11
ISSN 2211-3355
Keyword(s) physical activity
exercise
Fitness
health promotion
intervention
adolescent
high intensity interval training
school
Summary Current physical activity and fitness levels among adolescents are low, increasing the risk of chronic disease. Although the efficacy of high intensity interval training (HIIT) for improving metabolic health is now well established, it is not known if this type of activity can be effective to improve adolescent health. The primary aim of this study is to assess the effectiveness and feasibility of embedding HIIT into the school day. A 3-arm pilot randomized controlled trial was conducted in one secondary school in Newcastle, Australia. Participants (n = 65; mean age = 15.8(0.6) years) were randomized into one of three conditions: aerobic exercise program (AEP) (n = 21), resistance and aerobic exercise program (RAP) (n = 22) and control (n = 22). The 8-week intervention consisted of three HIIT sessions per week (8-10 min/session), delivered during physical education (PE) lessons or at lunchtime. Assessments were conducted at baseline and post-intervention to detect changes in cardiorespiratory fitness (multi-stage shuttle-run), muscular fitness (push-up, standing long jump tests), body composition (Body Mass Index (BMI), BMI-z scores, waist circumference) and physical activity motivation (questionnaire), by researchers blinded to treatment allocation. Intervention effects for outcomes were examined using linear mixed models, and Cohen's d effect sizes were reported. Participants in the AEP and RAP groups had moderate intervention effects for waist circumference (p = 0.024), BMI-z (p = 0.037) and BMI (not significant) in comparison to the control group. A small intervention effect was also evident for cardiorespiratory fitness in the RAP group.
Language eng
DOI 10.1016/j.pmedr.2015.11.001
Field of Research 110699 Human Movement and Sports Science not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2015, The Authors
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30084117

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: Centre for Physical Activity and Nutrition Research
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