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Assuaging death anxiety in older overseas-born Australians of culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds hospitalised for end-of-life care

Johnstone, Megan-Jane, Hutchinson, Alison, Rawson, Helen and Redley, Bernice 2016, Assuaging death anxiety in older overseas-born Australians of culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds hospitalised for end-of-life care, Contemporary nurse, vol. 52, no. 2-3, pp. 269-285, doi: 10.1080/10376178.2016.1192953.

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Title Assuaging death anxiety in older overseas-born Australians of culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds hospitalised for end-of-life care
Author(s) Johnstone, Megan-Jane
Hutchinson, AlisonORCID iD for Hutchinson, Alison orcid.org/0000-0001-5065-2726
Rawson, HelenORCID iD for Rawson, Helen orcid.org/0000-0001-5363-729X
Redley, BerniceORCID iD for Redley, Bernice orcid.org/0000-0002-2376-3989
Journal name Contemporary nurse
Volume number 52
Issue number 2-3
Start page 269
End page 285
Total pages 17
Publisher Taylor & Francis
Place of publication Abingdon, Eng.
Publication date 2016
ISSN 1839-3535
Keyword(s) Australia
aged
anxiety
death
hospitalisation
immigrants
nurses
terminal care
Summary BACKGROUND: Death anxiety is a known phenomenon in older people of culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds (CALD) hospitalised for end-of-life (EOL) care . Little is known about how nurses assuage death anxiety in this population. AIMS: To investigate strategies used by nurses to assuage death anxiety and facilitate a good death in older CALD Australians hospitalised for EOL care.

METHODS: Advanced as a qualitative descriptive inquiry, a purposeful sample of 22 nurses was recruited from four Victorian healthcare services. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed using thematic analysis processes.

FINDINGS: Nurses used three key strategies: recognising death anxiety; delineating its dimensions; and initiating conventional nursingcaring behaviours to help contain it. Contrary to expectations, cultural similarities rather than differences were found in the strategies used.

CONCLUSIONS: Nursing strategies for recognising, delineating, and managing death anxiety in older CALD people hospitalised at the EOL is an important component of quality EOL care.
Language eng
DOI 10.1080/10376178.2016.1192953
Field of Research 111099 Nursing not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920210 Nursing
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, Taylor and Francis
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30084148

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.