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Television viewing time and 13-year mortality in adults with cardiovascular disease: data from the Australian Diabetes, Obesity and Lifestyle Study (AusDiab)

Rogerson, Michelle C., Le Grande, Michael R., Dunstan, David W., Magliano, Dianna J., Murphy, Barbara M., Salmon, Jo, Gardiner, Paul A. and Jackson, Alun C. 2016, Television viewing time and 13-year mortality in adults with cardiovascular disease: data from the Australian Diabetes, Obesity and Lifestyle Study (AusDiab), Heart, lung and circulation, vol. 25, no. 8, pp. 829-836, doi: 10.1016/j.hlc.2016.03.006.

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Title Television viewing time and 13-year mortality in adults with cardiovascular disease: data from the Australian Diabetes, Obesity and Lifestyle Study (AusDiab)
Author(s) Rogerson, Michelle C.
Le Grande, Michael R.
Dunstan, David W.
Magliano, Dianna J.
Murphy, Barbara M.
Salmon, JoORCID iD for Salmon, Jo orcid.org/0000-0002-4734-6354
Gardiner, Paul A.
Jackson, Alun C.
Journal name Heart, lung and circulation
Volume number 25
Issue number 8
Start page 829
End page 836
Total pages 8
Publisher Elsevier
Place of publication Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Publication date 2016-08
ISSN 1444-2892
Keyword(s) Cardiovascular disease
Mortality
Prevalence
Risk factors
Sedentary behaviour
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Cardiac & Cardiovascular Systems
Cardiovascular System & Cardiology
CORONARY-HEART-DISEASE
ALL-CAUSE MORTALITY
RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED-TRIAL
QUALITY-OF-LIFE
PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY
SEDENTARY BEHAVIOR
OLDER-ADULTS
US ADULTS
MYOCARDIAL-INFARCTION
STROKE SURVIVORS
Summary BACKGROUND: In the general population, excessive sedentary behaviour is associated with increased all-cause mortality. Few studies have examined this relationship in people with cardiovascular disease (CVD). Using a sample of people with CVD who were excluded from an analysis of the Australian Diabetes, Obesity and Lifestyle (AusDiab) study, we examined the relationship between sedentary behaviour and 13-year all-cause mortality.

METHODS: In the original AusDiab study, television viewing time was used as a marker of sedentary behaviour in 609 adults (≥45 years of age) with CVD. During 6,291 person-years of follow-up (median follow-up 13 years), there were 294 deaths (48% of sample). Using the time scale of attained age, the Cox proportional hazards model predicting all-cause mortality adjusted for sex, self-rated general health, leisure-time physical activity, smoking status, education, household income, body mass index, lipid levels, blood pressure, and diabetes mellitus was used.

RESULTS: Compared with a TV viewing time of <2hours per day, the fully adjusted hazard ratios for all-cause mortality were 1.18 (95% CI, 0.88 to 1.57) for ≥2 to <4hours per day and 1.52 (95% CI, 1.09 to 2.13) for >4hours per day.

CONCLUSIONS: Sedentary behaviour was associated with increased risk of all-cause mortality in people with CVD, independent of physical activity and other confounders. In addition to the promotion of regular physical activity, cardiac rehabilitation efforts which also focus on reducing sedentary behaviour may be beneficial.
Language eng
DOI 10.1016/j.hlc.2016.03.006
Field of Research 110699 Human Movement and Sports Science not elsewhere classified
1102 Cardiovascular Medicine And Haematology
1117 Public Health And Health Services
Socio Economic Objective 920401 Behaviour and Health
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, Elsevier B.V.
Free to Read? No
Free to Read Start Date 2018-09-01
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30084184

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Created: Tue, 14 Jun 2016, 11:57:20 EST

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