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Implementing the Flinders Model of self-management support with Aboriginal people who have diabetes : findings from a pilot study

Battersby, Malcolm W., Ah Kit, Jackie, Prideaux, Colleen, Harvey, Peter W., Collins, James P. and Mills, Peter D. 2008, Implementing the Flinders Model of self-management support with Aboriginal people who have diabetes : findings from a pilot study, Australian journal of primary health, vol. 14, no. 1, pp. 66-74, doi: 10.1071/PY08009.

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Title Implementing the Flinders Model of self-management support with Aboriginal people who have diabetes : findings from a pilot study
Author(s) Battersby, Malcolm W.
Ah Kit, Jackie
Prideaux, Colleen
Harvey, Peter W.
Collins, James P.
Mills, Peter D.
Journal name Australian journal of primary health
Volume number 14
Issue number 1
Start page 66
End page 74
Total pages 9
Publisher CSIRO Publishing
Place of publication Clayton, Vic.
Publication date 2008
ISSN 1448-7527
1836-7399
Keyword(s) Aboriginal health
diabetes
chronic-condition self-management
rural health
care planning
Summary A pilot program for Aboriginal people with diabetes on Eyre Peninsula, South Australia, aimed to test the acceptability and impact of using the Flinders model of self-management care planing to improve patient self-management. A community development approach was used to conduct a twelve-month demonstration project. Aboriginal health workers (AHWs) conducted patient-centred, self-management assessment and care planning. Impacts were measured by patient-completed diabetes self-management assessment tool, goal achievement, quality of life and clinical measures at baseline and 12 months. Impact and acceptability were also assessed by semi-structured interviews and focus groups of AHWs. Sixty Aboriginal people with type 2 diabetes stated their main problems as family and social dysfunction, access to services, nutrition and exercise. Problems improved by 12% and goals by 26%, while quality of life scores showed no significant change. Self-management scores improved in five of six domains. Mean HbA1c reduced from 8.74-8.09 and mean blood pressure was unchanged. AHWs found the process acceptable and appropriate for them and their patients. It was concluded that a diabetes self-management program provided by AHWs is acceptable, improves self-management and is seen to be useful by Aboriginal communities. Barriers include lack of preventative health services, social problems and time pressure on staff. Enablers include community concern regarding the prevalence and mortality associated with diabetes.
Language eng
DOI 10.1071/PY08009
Field of Research 111701 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health
Socio Economic Objective 920412 Preventive Medicine
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2008, CSIRO Publishing
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30084219

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Medicine
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