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Transition to specialty practice program characteristics and professional development outcomes

Morphet, Julia, Kent, Bridie, Plummer, Virginia and Considine, Julie 2016, Transition to specialty practice program characteristics and professional development outcomes, Nurse education today, vol. 44, pp. 109-115, doi: 10.1016/j.nedt.2016.05.017.

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Title Transition to specialty practice program characteristics and professional development outcomes
Author(s) Morphet, Julia
Kent, Bridie
Plummer, Virginia
Considine, JulieORCID iD for Considine, Julie orcid.org/0000-0003-3801-2456
Journal name Nurse education today
Volume number 44
Start page 109
End page 115
Total pages 7
Publisher Elsevier
Place of publication Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Publication date 2016-09
ISSN 0260-6917
1532-2793
Keyword(s) Emergency nursing
Novice nurses
Professional development
Transition program
Summary BACKGROUND: Transition to Specialty Practice Programs was introduced to facilitate the transition of nurses to specialty practice, and is recognised as preparatory for emergency nurses. Emergency nursing Transition to Specialty Practice Programs and their characteristics have developed locally in response to unit needs. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to examine the characteristics of emergency nursing Transition to Specialty Practice Programs in Australia, and identify which characteristics were associated with improved professional development outcomes. METHODS: An explanatory sequential design was used. Data were collected via online surveys and interviews of emergency Nurse Managers and Nurse Educators. Transition to Specialty Practice Program characteristics were compared using Mann Whitney U and Chi-Square tests. Content analysis was used to analyse qualitative data. RESULTS: Survey data were collected from 118 emergency departments, and 13 interviews were conducted. Transition to Specialty Practice Programs were offered in most emergency departments (n=80, 72.1%), with one or two intakes per year. Transition to Specialty Practice Program characteristics varied; duration ranged from 5-12months, clinical preparation time ranged from 7-22days, and the number of study days provided ranged from 2-6. When Transition to Specialty Practice Programs of 6 and 12months duration were compared, there was no difference in the content covered. Emergency departments with 12month Transition to Specialty Practice Programs had lower percentages of Clinical Specialists (9% vs 18%, p=0.03) and postgraduate qualified nurses (30.5% vs 43.8%, p=0.09). CONCLUSION: The target participants, duration and clinical preparation of Transition to Specialty Practice Programs participants varied, impeding workforce mobility and articulation to postgraduate study and there were no professional development advantages from longer programs. There is an urgent need for a nationally consistent, evidence-based and fiscally responsible approach to Transition to Specialty Practice Programs.
Language eng
DOI 10.1016/j.nedt.2016.05.017
Field of Research 111003 Clinical Nursing: Secondary (Acute Care)
1110 Nursing
Socio Economic Objective 920210 Nursing
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, Elsevier
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30084270

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Nursing and Midwifery
Centre for Quality and Patient Safety
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