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Taphonomy and palaeobiology of early Middle Triassic coprolites from the Luoping biota, southwest China: implications for reconstruction of fossil food webs

Luo, Mao, Hu, Shixue, Benton, Michael J., Shi, G. R., Zhao, Laishi, Huang, Jinyuan, Song, Haijun, Wen, Wen, Zhang, Qiyue, Fang, Yuheng, Huang, Yuangeng and Chen, Zhong-Qiang 2016, Taphonomy and palaeobiology of early Middle Triassic coprolites from the Luoping biota, southwest China: implications for reconstruction of fossil food webs, Palaeogeography, palaeoclimatology, palaeoecology, In press, pp. 1-15, doi: 10.1016/j.palaeo.2016.06.001.

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Title Taphonomy and palaeobiology of early Middle Triassic coprolites from the Luoping biota, southwest China: implications for reconstruction of fossil food webs
Author(s) Luo, Mao
Hu, Shixue
Benton, Michael J.
Shi, G. R.ORCID iD for Shi, G. R. orcid.org/0000-0002-5126-4036
Zhao, Laishi
Huang, Jinyuan
Song, Haijun
Wen, Wen
Zhang, Qiyue
Fang, Yuheng
Huang, Yuangeng
Chen, Zhong-Qiang
Journal name Palaeogeography, palaeoclimatology, palaeoecology
Season In press
Start page 1
End page 15
Total pages 15
Publisher Elsevier
Place of publication Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Publication date 2016-06
ISSN 0031-0182
Keyword(s) Predation-prey
Food web
Biotic recovery
Anisian
Yunnan Province
Summary Abundant, exceptionally preserved coprolites are documented from the Luoping biota (Anisian, Middle Triassic) of Yunnan Province, southwest China. These coprolites can be categorized into fourmorphological types: A) bead to ribbon-shaped, B) short to long cylindrical-shaped, C) flattened, disk-like, and D) segmented faeces. Detailed multi-disciplinary studies reveal that coprolite type A was likely produced by invertebrate animals,while coprolite types B to D could be faeces generated by carnivorous fishes or marine reptiles, perhaps from different taxonomicgroups. When compared with coprolites reported from the Lower Triassic, the Luoping forms indicate more complicated predation-prey food web networks. These evidences, combined with body fossil discoveries fromLuoping, suggest the emergence of complex trophic ecosystems in the Anisian,marking the full biotic recovery following the Permian–Triassic Mass Extinction.
Language eng
DOI 10.1016/j.palaeo.2016.06.001
Field of Research 040308 Palaeontology (incl Palynology)
060305 Evolution of Developmental Systems
0403 Geology
0602 Ecology
0603 Evolutionary Biology
Socio Economic Objective 970104 Expanding Knowledge in the Earth Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, Elsevier B.V.
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30084278

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