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Predictors of vitamin D-containing supplement use in the Australian population and associations between dose and serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations

Black, Lucinda J., Jacoby, Peter, Nowson, Caryl A., Daly, Robin M. and Lucas, Robyn M. 2016, Predictors of vitamin D-containing supplement use in the Australian population and associations between dose and serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations, Nutrients, vol. 8, no. 6, pp. 1-13, doi: 10.3390/nu8060356.

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Title Predictors of vitamin D-containing supplement use in the Australian population and associations between dose and serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations
Author(s) Black, Lucinda J.
Jacoby, Peter
Nowson, Caryl A.
Daly, Robin M.
Lucas, Robyn M.
Journal name Nutrients
Volume number 8
Issue number 6
Start page 1
End page 13
Total pages 13
Publisher MDPI AG
Place of publication Basel, Switzerland
Publication date 2016
ISSN 2072-6643
Keyword(s) 25-hydroxyvitamin D
supplements
vitamin D
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Nutrition & Dietetics
D DEFICIENCY
D LEVEL
ADULTS
CHILDREN
OBESITY
HEALTH
TRIAL
Australia, Vitamin D
Supplements, 25-Hydroxivitamin D
Summary Despite concerns about vitamin D deficiency in the Australian population, little is known about the prevalence and predictors of vitamin D-containing supplement use. We described the use of vitamin D-containing supplements, and investigated associations between supplemental vitamin D intake and serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) concentrations, using a single 24-h dietary recall from the 2011-2013 Australian Health Survey (n = 12,153; ages ≥ 2 years). Multiple regression models were used to investigate predictors of vitamin D-containing supplement use in adults, and associations between dose and serum 25(OH)D concentrations/vitamin D sufficiency (≥50 nmol/L), adjusting for potential confounders. The prevalence of vitamin D-containing supplement use was 10%, 6% and 19% in children, adolescents and adults, respectively. Predictors of vitamin D-containing supplement use in adults included being female, advancing age, higher educational attainment, higher socio-economic status, not smoking, and greater physical activity. After adjusting for potential confounders, a 40 IU (1 µg) increase in vitamin D intake from supplements was associated with an increase of 0.41 nmol/L in serum 25(OH)D concentrations (95% CI 0.35, 0.47; p < 0.001). However, the prevalence of vitamin D-containing supplement use was generally low in the Australian population, particularly for single vitamin D supplements, with most supplement users obtaining only low levels of vitamin D from other supplement types.
Language eng
DOI 10.3390/nu8060356
Field of Research 111199 Nutrition and Dietetics not elsewhere classified
1111 Nutrition And Dietetics
Socio Economic Objective 920499 Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health) not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30084362

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Psychology
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.