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Death reminders increase agreement with extremist views but not violent extremist action in Indonesian Muslims

Iqbal, Muhammad, O'Brien, Kerry S., Bliuc, Ana-Maria and Vergani, Matteo 2016, Death reminders increase agreement with extremist views but not violent extremist action in Indonesian Muslims, Journal of cross-cultural psychology, vol. 47, no. 6, pp. 891-897, doi: 10.1177/0022022116646875.

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Title Death reminders increase agreement with extremist views but not violent extremist action in Indonesian Muslims
Author(s) Iqbal, Muhammad
O'Brien, Kerry S.
Bliuc, Ana-Maria
Vergani, MatteoORCID iD for Vergani, Matteo orcid.org/0000-0003-0546-4771
Journal name Journal of cross-cultural psychology
Volume number 47
Issue number 6
Start page 891
End page 897
Total pages 7
Publisher Sage
Place of publication Thousand Oaks, Calif.
Publication date 2016-07
ISSN 0022-0221
1552-5422
Keyword(s) terrorism
extremism
violent extremism
Indonesia
terror management theory
Social Sciences
Psychology, Social
Psychology
MORTALITY SALIENCE
INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS
TERROR MANAGEMENT
Summary Using terror management theory, we examined whether mortality salience (MS; death-related cognitions) increased support for religious and political extremism and/or violent extremism in young Indonesian Muslims. Muslim and non-Muslim Indonesian students studying in Australia were randomized to an MS or control condition. Following completion of a distracter task, participants were asked to rate their agreement/disagreement with another Indonesian Muslim student’s (bogus) statements toward extremist views and violent extremist actions. After controlling for alienation, Muslim students in the MS condition reported significantly higher levels of support for extremist views than did non-Muslims. There was no significant effect of MS on violent extremist action in either Muslims or non-Muslims. The results suggest that reminders of death (MS) may lead young Muslims to be more supportive of politically and religiously extreme views, but not violent action. Our findings lend partial support to previous research in Iranian Muslim students; however, further research is needed to establish factors that can result in increased support for violent extremism.
Language eng
DOI 10.1177/0022022116646875
Field of Research 160803 Race and Ethnic Relations
Socio Economic Objective 970116 Expanding Knowledge through Studies of Human Society
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Free to Read Start Date 2017-08-01
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30084421

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.