The microbiome and mental health: looking back, moving forward with lessons from allergic diseases

Logan, Alan C., Jacka, Felice N., Craig, Jeffrey M. and Prescott, Susan L. 2016, The microbiome and mental health: looking back, moving forward with lessons from allergic diseases, Clinical psychopharmacology and neuroscience, vol. 14, no. 2, pp. 131-147, doi: 10.9758/cpn.2016.14.2.131.

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Title The microbiome and mental health: looking back, moving forward with lessons from allergic diseases
Author(s) Logan, Alan C.
Jacka, Felice N.ORCID iD for Jacka, Felice N. orcid.org/0000-0002-9825-0328
Craig, Jeffrey M.
Prescott, Susan L.
Journal name Clinical psychopharmacology and neuroscience
Volume number 14
Issue number 2
Start page 131
End page 147
Total pages 17
Publisher Korean College of Neuropsychopharmacology
Place of publication Seoul, Korea
Publication date 2016
ISSN 1738-1088
Keyword(s) Allergy and Immunology
Anxiety
Depression
Diet
Human microbiome
Microbiota
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Neurosciences
Pharmacology & Pharmacy
Neurosciences & Neurology
CHRONIC-FATIGUE-SYNDROME
QUALITY-OF-LIFE
MAJOR DEPRESSIVE DISORDER
INCREASED INTESTINAL PERMEABILITY
MEDITERRANEAN DIETARY PATTERN
EPITHELIAL BARRIER FUNCTION
RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED-TRIAL
AUTISM SPECTRUM DISORDERS
CONTROLLED CLINICAL-TRIAL
PLACEBO-CONTROLLED TRIAL
Summary Relationships between gastrointestinal viscera and human emotions have been documented by virtually all medical traditions known to date. The focus on this relationship has waxed and waned through the centuries, with noted surges in interest driven by cultural forces. Here we explore some of this history and the emerging trends in experimental and clinical research. In particular, we pay specific attention to how the hygiene hypothesis and emerging research on traditional dietary patterns has helped re-ignite interest in the use of microbes to support mental health. At present, the application of microbes and their structural parts as a means to positively influence mental health is an area filled with promise. However, there are many limitations within this new paradigm shift in neuropsychiatry. Impediments that could block translation of encouraging experimental studies include environmental forces that work toward dysbiosis, perhaps none more important than westernized dietary patterns. On the other hand, it is likely that specific dietary choices may amplify the value of future microbial-based therapeutics. Pre-clinical and clinical research involving microbiota and allergic disorders has predated recent work in psychiatry, an early start that provides valuable lessons. The microbiome is intimately connected to diet, nutrition, and other lifestyle variables; microbial-based psychopharmacology will need to consider this contextual application, otherwise the ceiling of clinical expectations will likely need to be lowered.
Language eng
DOI 10.9758/cpn.2016.14.2.131
Field of Research 110999 Neurosciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, Korean College of Neuropsychopharmacology
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30084510

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Medicine
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