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Concurrent exercise incorporating high-intensity interval or continuous training modulates mTORC1 signaling and microRNA expression in human skeletal muscle

Fyfe, Jackson J., Bishop, David J., Zacharewicz, Evelyn, Russell, Aaron P. and Stepto, Nigel K. 2016, Concurrent exercise incorporating high-intensity interval or continuous training modulates mTORC1 signaling and microRNA expression in human skeletal muscle, American journal of physiology - regulatory, integrative and comparative physiology, vol. 310, no. 11, pp. R1297-R1311, doi: 10.1152/ajpregu.00479.2015.

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Title Concurrent exercise incorporating high-intensity interval or continuous training modulates mTORC1 signaling and microRNA expression in human skeletal muscle
Author(s) Fyfe, Jackson J.
Bishop, David J.
Zacharewicz, Evelyn
Russell, Aaron P.
Stepto, Nigel K.
Journal name American journal of physiology - regulatory, integrative and comparative physiology
Volume number 310
Issue number 11
Start page R1297
End page R1311
Total pages 15
Publisher American Physiological Society
Place of publication Bethesda, Md.
Publication date 2016-06-01
ISSN 1522-1490
Keyword(s) concurrent training
continuous training
exercise intensity
high-intensity interval training
interference
Summary We compared the effects of concurrent exercise, incorporating either high-intensity interval training (HIT) or moderate-intensity continuous training (MICT), on mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling and microRNA expression in skeletal muscle, relative to resistance exercise (RE) alone. Eight males (mean ± SD: age, 27 ± 4 yr; V̇o2 peak , 45.7 ± 9 ml·kg(-1)·min(-1)) performed three experimental trials in a randomized order: 1) RE (8 × 5 leg press repetitions at 80% 1-repetition maximum) performed alone and RE preceded by either 2) HIT cycling [10 × 2 min at 120% lactate threshold (LT); HIT + RE] or 3) work-matched MICT cycling (30 min at 80% LT; MICT + RE). Vastus lateralis muscle biopsies were obtained immediately before RE, either without (REST) or with (POST) preceding endurance exercise and +1 h (RE + 1 h) and +3 h (RE + 3 h) after RE. Prior HIT and MICT similarly reduced muscle glycogen content and increased ACC(Ser79) and p70S6K(Thr389) phosphorylation before subsequent RE (i.e., at POST). Compared with MICT, HIT induced greater mTOR(Ser2448) and rps6(Ser235/236) phosphorylation at POST. RE-induced increases in p70S6K and rps6 phosphorylation were not influenced by prior HIT or MICT; however, mTOR phosphorylation was reduced at RE + 1 h for MICT + RE vs. both HIT + RE and RE. Expression of miR-133a, miR-378, and miR-486 was reduced at RE + 1 h for HIT + RE vs. both MICT + RE and RE. Postexercise mTORC1 signaling following RE is therefore not compromised by prior HIT or MICT, and concurrent exercise incorporating HIT, but not MICT, reduces postexercise expression of miRNAs implicated in skeletal muscle adaptation to RE.
Language eng
DOI 10.1152/ajpregu.00479.2015
Field of Research 110699 Human Movement and Sports Science not elsewhere classified
06 Biological Sciences
11 Medical And Health Sciences
Socio Economic Objective 920116 Skeletal System and Disorders (incl. Arthritis)
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, American Physiological Society
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30084552

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences
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