You are not logged in.

Where are the animals in sustainable development? Religion and the case for ethical stewardship in animal husbandry

Narayanan, Yamini 2016, Where are the animals in sustainable development? Religion and the case for ethical stewardship in animal husbandry, Sustainable development, vol. 24, no. 3, Special issue on religion, sustainable development and policy: principles to practice, pp. 172-180, doi: 10.1002/sd.1619.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Title Where are the animals in sustainable development? Religion and the case for ethical stewardship in animal husbandry
Author(s) Narayanan, Yamini
Journal name Sustainable development
Volume number 24
Issue number 3
Season Special issue on religion, sustainable development and policy: principles to practice
Start page 172
End page 180
Total pages 9
Publisher Wiley
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2016-05
ISSN 0968-0802
1099-1719
Keyword(s) animal husbandry
factory farming
religion
policy
Science & Technology
Social Sciences
GREEN & SUSTAINABLE SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Planning & Development
Science & Technology - Other Topics
Public Administration
Summary The rights of livestock that are designated as food/farm animals have been a blindspot across development discourse and policies in spite of compelling moral (and socio-ecological) factors. They are regarded as 'resources' to sustain growth, leading to food production systems that support factory farming and invasive animal husbandry practices. The paper argues that religion and sustainable development are unlikely partners in the commodification of animals in these policies. Capitalist-driven interpretations of religion support the objectification of animals. Sustainable development, an efficiency-driven growth paradigm, is concerned with the preservation of finite natural resources. Sentient factory farmed animals are seen as infinite resources.Using Christianity and Hinduism as examples, the paper argues that religion can also shape alternative animal husbandry/food production practices, and expand the social justice element of sustainable development to encompass what I term 'sociozoological justice' in economic systems that heavily involve animals.
Language eng
DOI 10.1002/sd.1619
Field of Research 160101 Anthropology of Development
160605 Environmental Politics
MD Multidisciplinary
Socio Economic Objective 970116 Expanding Knowledge through Studies of Human Society
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, John Wiley & Sons
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30084586

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: Alfred Deakin Research Institute
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 1 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 1 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 77 Abstract Views, 1 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Fri, 01 Jul 2016, 11:36:37 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.