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Validity of a job-exposure matrix for psychosocial job stressors: results from the household income and labour dynamics in Australia survey

Milner, A, Niedhammer, I, Chastang, J-F, Spittal, MJ and LaMontagne, AD 2016, Validity of a job-exposure matrix for psychosocial job stressors: results from the household income and labour dynamics in Australia survey, PLoS one, vol. 11, no. 4, pp. 1-13, doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0152980.

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Title Validity of a job-exposure matrix for psychosocial job stressors: results from the household income and labour dynamics in Australia survey
Author(s) Milner, A
Niedhammer, I
Chastang, J-F
Spittal, MJ
LaMontagne, ADORCID iD for LaMontagne, AD orcid.org/0000-0002-5811-5906
Journal name PLoS one
Volume number 11
Issue number 4
Article ID e0152980
Start page 1
End page 13
Total pages 13
Publisher Public Library of Science
Place of publication San Francisco, Calif.
Publication date 2016-04-06
ISSN 1932-6203
Keyword(s) Adult
Australia
Female
Humans
Income
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases
Stress, Psychological
Surveys and Questionnaires
Young Adult
Science & Technology
Multidisciplinary Sciences
Work environment
Mental health
Cardiovascular mortality
Summary Introduction
A Job Exposure Matrix (JEM) for psychosocial job stressors allows assessment of these exposures at a population level. JEMs are particularly useful in situations when information on psychosocial job stressors were not collected individually and can help eliminate the biases that may be present in individual self-report accounts. This research paper describes the development of a JEM in the Australian context.

Methods
The Household Income Labour Dynamics in Australia (HILDA) survey was used to construct a JEM for job control, job demands and complexity, job insecurity, and fairness of pay. Population median values of these variables for all employed people (n = 20,428) were used to define individual exposures across the period 2001 to 2012. The JEM was calculated for the Australian and New Zealand Standard Classification of Occupations (ANZSCO) at the four-digit level, which represents 358 occupations. Both continuous and binary exposures to job stressors were calculated at the 4-digit level. We assessed concordance between the JEM-assigned and individually-reported exposures using the Kappa statistic, sensitivity and specificity assessments. We conducted regression analysis using mental health as an outcome measure.

Results
Kappa statistics indicate good agreement between individually-reported and JEM-assigned dichotomous measures for job demands and control, and moderate agreement for job insecurity and fairness of pay. Job control, job demands and security had the highest sensitivity, while specificity was relatively high for the four exposures. Regression analysis shows that most individually reported and JEM measures were significantly associated with mental health, and individually-reported exposures produced much stronger effects on mental health than the JEM-assigned exposures.

Discussion

These JEM-based estimates of stressors exposure provide a conservative proxy for individual-level data, and can be applied to a range of health and organisational outcomes.
Language eng
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0152980
Field of Research MD Multidisciplinary
Socio Economic Objective 0 Not Applicable
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2016, Milner et al
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30084639

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Health and Social Development
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Created: Mon, 04 Jul 2016, 13:06:19 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.