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Zinc and infant nutrition

Ackland, M. Leigh and Michalczyk, Agnes A. 2016, Zinc and infant nutrition, Archives of biochemistry and biophysics, vol. 611, pp. 51-57, doi: 10.1016/j.abb.2016.06.011.

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Title Zinc and infant nutrition
Author(s) Ackland, M. LeighORCID iD for Ackland, M. Leigh orcid.org/0000-0002-7474-6556
Michalczyk, Agnes A.ORCID iD for Michalczyk, Agnes A. orcid.org/0000-0001-5716-0783
Journal name Archives of biochemistry and biophysics
Volume number 611
Start page 51
End page 57
Total pages 7
Publisher Elsevier
Place of publication Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Publication date 2016-12-01
ISSN 1096-0384
1096-0384
Keyword(s) zinc
infant nutrition
Zn bioavailability
Zn deficiency
Zn supplementation
Summary Zinc is essential for a wide variety of cellular processes in all cells. It is a critical dietary nutrient, particularly in the early stages of life. In the early neonatal period, adequate sources of zinc can be obtained from breast milk. In rare circumstances, the mammary gland produces zinc deficient milk that is potentially lethal for exclusively breast-fed infants. This can be overcome by zinc supplementation to the infant. Alterations to key zinc transporters provide insights into the mechanisms of cellular zinc homeostasis. The bioavailability of zinc in food depends on the presence of constituents that may complex zinc. In many countries, zinc deficiency is a major health issue due to poor nourishment. Young children are particularly affected. Zinc deficiency can impair immune function and contributes to the global burden of infectious diseases including diarrhoea, pneumonia and malaria. Furthermore, zinc deficiency may extend its influence across generations by inducing epigenetic effects that alter the expression of genes. This review discusses the significance of adequate zinc nutrition in infants, factors that influence zinc nutrition, the consequences of zinc deficiency, including its contribution to the global burden of disease, and addresses some of the knowledge gaps in zinc biology.
Language eng
DOI 10.1016/j.abb.2016.06.011
Field of Research 119999 Medical and Health Sciences not elsewhere classified
110399 Clinical Sciences not elsewhere classified
0601 Biochemistry And Cell Biology
Socio Economic Objective 920411 Nutrition
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, Elsevier
Free to Read? Yes
Free to Read Start Date 2017-12-02
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30084658

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Created: Thu, 28 Jul 2016, 10:46:12 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.