The effect of low parental warmth and low monitoring on disordered eating in mid-adolescence: findings from the Australian Temperament Project

Krug, Isabel, King, Ross M., Youssef, George J., Sorabji, Anisha, Wertheim, Eleanor H., Le Grange, Daniel, Hughes, Elizabeth K., Letcher, Primrose and Olsson, Craig A. 2016, The effect of low parental warmth and low monitoring on disordered eating in mid-adolescence: findings from the Australian Temperament Project, Appetite, vol. 105, pp. 232-241, doi: 10.1016/j.appet.2016.05.015.

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Title The effect of low parental warmth and low monitoring on disordered eating in mid-adolescence: findings from the Australian Temperament Project
Author(s) Krug, Isabel
King, Ross M.ORCID iD for King, Ross M. orcid.org/0000-0002-0819-7077
Youssef, George J.ORCID iD for Youssef, George J. orcid.org/0000-0002-6178-4895
Sorabji, Anisha
Wertheim, Eleanor H.
Le Grange, Daniel
Hughes, Elizabeth K.
Letcher, Primrose
Olsson, Craig A.ORCID iD for Olsson, Craig A. orcid.org/0000-0002-5927-2014
Journal name Appetite
Volume number 105
Start page 232
End page 241
Total pages 10
Publisher Elsevier
Place of publication Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Publication date 2016-10-01
ISSN 0195-6663
1095-8304
Keyword(s) Additive interaction
Adolescents
Disordered eating
Monitoring
Parenting style
Warmth
Summary OBJECTIVE: To investigate the interactions between low parental warmth and monitoring at age 13-14 years and disordered eating attitudes and behaviours at age 15-16 years. METHOD: Data on 1300 (667 females) adolescents and their parents were drawn from The Australian Temperament Project (ATP), a 30 year (15 wave) population based longitudinal study of social-emotional development. Parent participants completed surveys on parenting practices in late childhood, and adolescent participants reported disordered eating using the drive for thinness and bulimia subscales of the Eating Disorder Inventory (EDI) and an additional body dissatisfaction scale. Interaction was examined on the additive scale by estimating super-additive risk; i.e., risk in excess of the sum of individual risks. RESULTS: For boys, neither parental warmth or monitoring, nor their interaction, was related to disordered eating. For girls, low parental warmth (alone) was associated with bulimic behaviours. In contrast, exposure to both low monitoring and warmth was associated with ∼3½-fold, ∼4-fold and ∼5-fold increases in the odds of reporting body dissatisfaction, drive for thinness and bulimia, respectively. For body dissatisfaction and drive for thinness, risk associated with joint exposure exceeded the sum of individual risks, suggesting an additive interaction between parenting styles. CONCLUSION: Further investment in family-level interventions that focus on promoting parental monitoring behaviour and a warm parent-child relationship remain important strategies for preventing a range of disordered eating behaviours in adolescents.
Language eng
DOI 10.1016/j.appet.2016.05.015
Field of Research 170106 Health, Clinical and Counselling Psychology
Socio Economic Objective 970117 Expanding Knowledge in Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, Elsevier
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30084661

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Psychology
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