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‘Computer games can get your brain working’: student experience and perceptions of digital games in the classroom

Beavis, Catherine, Muspratt, Sandy and Thompson, Roberta 2015, ‘Computer games can get your brain working’: student experience and perceptions of digital games in the classroom, Learning, media and technology, vol. 40, no. 1, pp. 21-42, doi: 10.1080/17439884.2014.904339.

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Title ‘Computer games can get your brain working’: student experience and perceptions of digital games in the classroom
Author(s) Beavis, Catherine
Muspratt, Sandy
Thompson, Roberta
Journal name Learning, media and technology
Volume number 40
Issue number 1
Start page 21
End page 42
Total pages 22
Publisher Taylor & Francis
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2015
ISSN 1743-9884
1743-9892
Keyword(s) computer and videogames
digital games
game-based learning
digital literacy
pedagogy
student perceptions
Summary There is considerable enthusiasm in many quarters for the incorporation of digital games into the classroom, and the capacity of games to engage and challenge players, present complex representations and experiences, foster collaborative learning, and promote deep learning. But while there is increasing research documenting the progress and outcomes of game-based learning, relatively little attention is paid to student perceptions and voice. In order to effectively target game-based learning pedagogy, it is important to understand students' previous experience, if any, of the use of games in the classroom, and what they made of these. In this paper, we present findings from a survey of 270 primary and secondary school students in Year Levels 4–9 (aged 9–14) in 6 Queensland schools at the start of a 3-year Australian Research Council project researching the use of digital games in school to promote literacy and learning.
Language eng
DOI 10.1080/17439884.2014.904339
Field of Research 130306 Educational Technology and Computing
1303 Specialist Studies In Education
2001 Communication And Media Studies
Socio Economic Objective 970113 Expanding Knowledge in Education
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2014, Taylor & Francis
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30084665

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Education
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