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Ibuprofen ingestion does not affect markers of post-exercise muscle inflammation

Vella, Luke, Markworth, James F., Paulsen, Goran, Raastad, Truls, Peake, Jonathan, Snow, Rod J., Cameron-Smith, David and Russell, Aaron P. 2016, Ibuprofen ingestion does not affect markers of post-exercise muscle inflammation, Frontiers in physiology, vol. 7, pp. 1-9, doi: 10.3389/fphys.2016.00086.

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Title Ibuprofen ingestion does not affect markers of post-exercise muscle inflammation
Author(s) Vella, Luke
Markworth, James F.
Paulsen, Goran
Raastad, Truls
Peake, Jonathan
Snow, Rod J.ORCID iD for Snow, Rod J. orcid.org/0000-0002-4796-6916
Cameron-Smith, David
Russell, Aaron P.ORCID iD for Russell, Aaron P. orcid.org/0000-0002-7323-9501
Journal name Frontiers in physiology
Volume number 7
Article ID 86
Start page 1
End page 9
Total pages 9
Publisher Frontiers Research Foundation
Place of publication Lausanne, Switzerland
Publication date 2016
ISSN 1664-042X
Keyword(s) NSAID treatment
exercise recovery
inflammation
leucocyte
resistance exercise
Summary PURPOSE: We investigated if oral ingestion of ibuprofen influenced leucocyte recruitment and infiltration following an acute bout of traditional resistance exercise Methods: Sixteen male subjects were divided into two groups that received the maximum over-the-counter dose of ibuprofen (1200mg d(-1)) or a similarly administered placebo following lower body resistance exercise. Muscle biopsies were taken from m.vastus lateralis and blood serum samples were obtained before and immediately after exercise, and at 3 and 24 h after exercise. Muscle cross-sections were stained with antibodies against neutrophils (CD66b and MPO) and macrophages (CD68). Muscle damage was assessed via creatine kinase and myoglobin in blood serum samples, and muscle soreness was rated on a ten-point pain scale.

RESULTS: The resistance exercise protocol stimulated a significant increase in the number of CD66b(+) and MPO(+) cells when measured 3 h post exercise. Serum creatine kinase, myoglobin and subjective muscle soreness all increased post-exercise. Muscle leucocyte infiltration, creatine kinase, myoglobin and subjective muscle soreness were unaffected by ibuprofen treatment when compared to placebo. There was also no association between increases in inflammatory leucocytes and any other marker of cellular muscle damage.

CONCLUSION: Ibuprofen administration had no effect on the accumulation of neutrophils, markers of muscle damage or muscle soreness during the first 24 h of post-exercise muscle recovery.
Language eng
DOI 10.3389/fphys.2016.00086
Field of Research 110699 Human Movement and Sports Science not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920499 Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health) not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30084698

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.