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Contextual determinants of intrusions and obsessions: The role of ego-dystonicity and the reality of obsessional thoughts

Audet, Jean-Sebastien, Aardema, Frederick and Moulding, Richard 2016, Contextual determinants of intrusions and obsessions: The role of ego-dystonicity and the reality of obsessional thoughts, Journal of obsessive-compulsive and related disorders, vol. 9, pp. 96-106, doi: 10.1016/j.jocrd.2016.04.003.

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Title Contextual determinants of intrusions and obsessions: The role of ego-dystonicity and the reality of obsessional thoughts
Author(s) Audet, Jean-Sebastien
Aardema, Frederick
Moulding, RichardORCID iD for Moulding, Richard orcid.org/0000-0001-7779-3166
Journal name Journal of obsessive-compulsive and related disorders
Volume number 9
Start page 96
End page 106
Total pages 11
Publisher Elsevier
Place of publication Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Publication date 2016-04
ISSN 2211-3649
2211-3657
Keyword(s) obsessions
OCD
ego-dystonicity
cognitive models
Summary The current study aimed to investigate whether lack of evidence for the potential reality of the intrusion and ego-dystonicity are contextual determinants of unwanted intrusive thoughts and clinical obsessions. To this end, a total 248 non-clinical participants were asked to report an intrusion they had experienced as well as the context in which the intrusion arose. Utilizing this information, three independent clinicians rated these intrusions on ego-dystonicity and whether the intrusion had occurred with or without any evidence for its potential reality. Results showed that ego-dystonicity and lack of evidence for the intrusions were related, but distinct constructs. In particular, intrusions that occurred without evidence were significantly associated with higher levels of self-reported OC symptoms and related cognitive domains, whereas ego-dystonicity was not related to OC symptoms. Overall, the results are consistent with the notion that abnormal intrusions occur without evidence in the here-and-now, whereas normal intrusions do not. Intrusions that have no evidence to back them up, yet occur without any apparent cause, may be particularly likely to invite further negative cognitive processing, over-interpretation and control attempts. Implications for further research and treatment are discussed.
Language eng
DOI 10.1016/j.jocrd.2016.04.003
Field of Research 170199 Psychology not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920410 Mental Health
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, Elsevier
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30084699

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Psychology
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