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Population genetic structure of serotine bats (Eptesicus serotinus) across Europe and implications for the potential spread of bat rabies (European bat lyssavirus EBLV-1).

Moussy, C, Atterby, H, Griffiths, A G, Allnutt, T R, Mathews, F, Smith, G C, Aegerter, J N, Bearhop, S and Hosken, D J 2015, Population genetic structure of serotine bats (Eptesicus serotinus) across Europe and implications for the potential spread of bat rabies (European bat lyssavirus EBLV-1)., Heredity, vol. 115, no. 1, pp. 83-92, doi: 10.1038/hdy.2015.20.

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Title Population genetic structure of serotine bats (Eptesicus serotinus) across Europe and implications for the potential spread of bat rabies (European bat lyssavirus EBLV-1).
Author(s) Moussy, C
Atterby, H
Griffiths, A G
Allnutt, T R
Mathews, F
Smith, G C
Aegerter, J N
Bearhop, S
Hosken, D J
Journal name Heredity
Volume number 115
Issue number 1
Start page 83
End page 92
Total pages 10
Publisher Nature Publishing
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2015-07
ISSN 1365-2540
Summary Understanding of the movements of species at multiple scales is essential to appreciate patterns of population connectivity and in some cases, the potential for pathogen transmission. The serotine bat (Eptesicus serotinus) is a common and widely distributed species in Europe where it frequently harbours European bat lyssavirus type 1 (EBLV-1), a virus causing rabies and transmissible to humans. In the United Kingdom, it is rare, with a distribution restricted to south of the country and so far the virus has never been found there. We investigated the genetic structure and gene flow of E. serotinus across the England and continental Europe. Greater genetic structuring was found in England compared with continental Europe. Nuclear data suggest a single population on the continent, although further work with more intensive sampling is required to confirm this, while mitochondrial sequences indicate an east-west substructure. In contrast, three distinct populations were found in England using microsatellite markers, and mitochondrial diversity was very low. Evidence of nuclear admixture indicated strong male-mediated gene flow among populations. Differences in connectivity could contribute to the high viral prevalence on the continent in contrast with the United Kingdom. Although the English Channel was previously thought to restrict gene flow, our data indicate relatively frequent movement from the continent to England highlighting the potential for movement of EBLV-1 into the United Kingdom.
Language eng
DOI 10.1038/hdy.2015.20
Field of Research 0604 Genetics
0603 Evolutionary Biology
119999 Medical and Health Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 929999 Health not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2015, Nature
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30084708

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Medicine
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