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Effect of an internet-based, personalized nutrition randomized trial on dietary changes associated with the Mediterranean diet: the Food4Me Study

Livingstone, Katherine M, Celis-Morales, Carlos, Navas-Carretero, Santiago, San-Cristobal, Rodrigo, Macready, Anna L, Fallaize, Rosalind, Forster, Hannah, Woolhead, Clara, O'Donovan, Clare B, Marsaux, Cyril FM, Kolossa, Silvia, Tsirigoti, Lydia, Lambrinou, Christina P, Moschonis, George, Godlewska, Magdalena, Surwiłło, Agnieszka, Drevon, Christian A, Manios, Yannis, Traczyk, Iwona, Gibney, Eileen R, Brennan, Lorraine, Walsh, Marianne C, Lovegrove, Julie A, Saris, Wim H, Daniel, Hannelore, Gibney, Mike, Martinez, J Alfredo and Mathers, John C 2016, Effect of an internet-based, personalized nutrition randomized trial on dietary changes associated with the Mediterranean diet: the Food4Me Study, American journal of clinical nutrition, vol. 104, no. 2, pp. 288-297, doi: 10.3945/ajcn.115.129049.

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Title Effect of an internet-based, personalized nutrition randomized trial on dietary changes associated with the Mediterranean diet: the Food4Me Study
Author(s) Livingstone, Katherine MORCID iD for Livingstone, Katherine M orcid.org/0000-0002-9682-7541
Celis-Morales, Carlos
Navas-Carretero, Santiago
San-Cristobal, Rodrigo
Macready, Anna L
Fallaize, Rosalind
Forster, Hannah
Woolhead, Clara
O'Donovan, Clare B
Marsaux, Cyril FM
Kolossa, Silvia
Tsirigoti, Lydia
Lambrinou, Christina P
Moschonis, George
Godlewska, Magdalena
Surwiłło, Agnieszka
Drevon, Christian A
Manios, Yannis
Traczyk, Iwona
Gibney, Eileen R
Brennan, Lorraine
Walsh, Marianne C
Lovegrove, Julie A
Saris, Wim H
Daniel, Hannelore
Gibney, Mike
Martinez, J Alfredo
Mathers, John C
Journal name American journal of clinical nutrition
Volume number 104
Issue number 2
Start page 288
End page 297
Total pages 10
Publisher American Society for Nutrition
Place of publication Rockville, Md.
Publication date 2016-08
ISSN 0002-9165
1938-3207
Keyword(s) Mediterranean diet
Food4Me
personalized nutrition
internet-based
European adults
Food4Me Study
Summary BACKGROUND: Little is known about the efficacy of personalized nutrition (PN) interventions for improving consumption of a Mediterranean diet (MedDiet).

OBJECTIVE: The objective was to evaluate the effect of a PN intervention on dietary changes associated with the MedDiet.

DESIGN: Participants (n = 1607) were recruited into a 6-mo, Internet-based, PN randomized controlled trial (Food4Me) designed to evaluate the effect of PN on dietary change. Participants were randomly assigned to receive conventional dietary advice [control; level 0 (L0)] or PN advice on the basis of current diet [level 1 (L1)], diet and phenotype [level 2 (L2)], or diet, phenotype, and genotype [level 3 (L3)]. Dietary intakes from food-frequency questionnaires at baseline and at 6 mo were converted to a MedDiet score. Linear regression compared participant characteristics between high (>5) and low (≤5) MedDiet scores. Differences in MedDiet scores between treatment arms at month 6 were evaluated by using contrast analyses.

RESULTS: At baseline, high MedDiet scorers had a 0.5 lower body mass index (in kg/m(2); P = 0.007) and a 0.03 higher physical activity level (P = 0.003) than did low scorers. MedDiet scores at month 6 were greater in individuals randomly assigned to receive PN (L1, L2, and L3) than in controls (PN compared with controls: 5.20 ± 0.05 and 5.48 ± 0.07, respectively; P = 0.002). There was no significant difference in MedDiet scores at month 6 between PN advice on the basis of L1 compared with L2 and L3. However, differences in MedDiet scores at month 6 were greater in L3 than in L2 (L3 compared with L2: 5.63 ± 0.10 and 5.38 ± 0.10, respectively; P = 0.029).

CONCLUSIONS: Higher MedDiet scores at baseline were associated with healthier lifestyles and lower adiposity. After the intervention, MedDiet scores were greater in individuals randomly assigned to receive PN than in controls, with the addition of DNA-based dietary advice resulting in the largest differences in MedDiet scores. Although differences were significant, their clinical relevance is modest.
Notes On behalf of the Food4Me Study.
Language eng
DOI 10.3945/ajcn.115.129049
Field of Research 111199 Nutrition and Dietetics not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920411 Nutrition
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, American Society for Nutrition
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30084720

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences
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