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Emerging drugs for partial-onset epilepsy: a review of brivaracetam

Gao, Lan and Li, Shuchuen 2016, Emerging drugs for partial-onset epilepsy: a review of brivaracetam, Therapeutics and clinical risk management, vol. 12, pp. 719-734, doi: 10.2147/TCRM.S90127.

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Title Emerging drugs for partial-onset epilepsy: a review of brivaracetam
Author(s) Gao, Lan
Li, Shuchuen
Journal name Therapeutics and clinical risk management
Volume number 12
Start page 719
End page 734
Total pages 16
Publisher Dove Press
Place of publication Macclesfield, Eng.
Publication date 2016
ISSN 1176-6336
Keyword(s) brivaracetam
drug-resistant epilepsy
partial-onset epilepsy
randomized controlled trial
review
Summary There are more than 12 new antiepileptic drugs approved in the last 2 decades. Even with these newer agents, seizure remission is still unachievable in around 30% of patients with partial-onset seizures (POS). Brivaracetam (BRV) is chemically related to levetiracetam (LEV) and possesses a strong binding affinity for the synaptic vesicle protein 2A tenfold above that of LEV, and other possible modes of antiepileptic actions. BRV is now under Phase III development for POS, but data from one Phase III trial also suggested its potential efficacy for primary generalized seizures. The purpose of this review is to provide updated information on the mechanisms of action of the available antiepileptic drugs, with a focus on BRV to assess its pharmacology, pharmacokinetics, clinical efficacy, safety, and tolerability in patients with uncontrolled POS. To date, six Phase IIb and III clinical trials have been performed to investigate the efficacy, safety, and tolerability of BRV as an adjunctive treatment for patients with POS. Generally, BRV was well tolerated and did not show significant difference in safety profile, compared to placebo. The efficacy outcomes of BRV, although not consistent across trials, did indicate that BRV was a promising add-on therapy for patients with POS. In conclusion, the many favorable attributes of BRV, like its high oral efficacy, good tolerability, dosing regimen, and minimal drug interaction, make it a promising antiepileptic therapy for patients with uncontrolled partial-onset epilepsy.
Language eng
DOI 10.2147/TCRM.S90127
Field of Research 111502 Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics
1117 Public Health And Health Services
Socio Economic Objective 920111 Nervous System and Disorders
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution non-commercial licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30084734

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Population Health
Open Access Collection
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.